News from San Antonio Church – May 24, 2020

It appears that the very first possible day that we may resume the Celebration of Mass at San Antonio Church will be May 31st. The State of Ohio advised that there should be no gatherings in churches up until May 29th. and the Catholic Bishops of Ohio agreed We are not sure if we will actually start that day . Please check back on the website for updates.

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons below allow you to make an online donation directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin

by Terrie Evans

On this Sunday we honor the Ascension of Jesus which occurs 40 days after he rose from the dead on Easter.  This day commemorates the Risen Christ ascending into heaven in the presence of His Apostles.  This feast tells us that when Jesus Christ entered the sanctuary of heaven, He will intercede as a mediator for us and assures us the permanent outpouring of the Holy Spirit.  The Ascension is  the concluding work of redemption and the pledge of our own eventual ascension into heaven.   In the Catholic Tradition, it began as a three  day “rogation” to ask for God’s Mercy with a procession of torches and banners symbolizing Christ’s journey to the Mount of Olives and His entry into Heaven.  Rogation days of penance and prayers were similar to Ember days and in 1969 were replaced by periods of prayer extending from one to several days. 

Early Christians would honor the Ascension of Christ in a cave on the Mount around 312 AD.  The village of Bethany is the location of the traditional site of Mount Olivet where those Christians honored the Ascension.  Around 384, the Ascension was venerated on a new site, uphill from the cave.  Luke Chapter  24 tells how Jesus leads the eleven disciples to Bethany where he instructs them to remain in Jerusalem until the coming of the Holy Spirit.  In  the year 390, a wealthy Roman woman, Poimenia constructed the original church, “Eleona Basilica” Greek for Olive Garden which was destroyed in 614 and rebuilt and eventually demolished.  There is only a 12X12 meter octagonal Edicule or memorial that remains.  Inside of the structure is the Rock of the Ascension as the last remnants of the original basilica.  Also, on the top of the Mount of Olives is a Convent of the Ascension that is maintained by the Russian Orthodox Church.  

Many will pray a Novena to the Holy Ghost between Ascension and Pentecost asking for the Gifts of the Holy Spirit.  In Christian Theology, the death, resurrection and exaltation of Jesus are the most important events and a foundation of the Christian Faith.  The Ascension has been a frequent subject of Christian art since the 6th century.  Around the 9th Century, scenes of the Ascension were being depicted on domes and churches with many scenes having two parts, an upper (Heavenly) part and a lower (Earthly) part.  The ascending Christ may be carrying a resurrection banner or make a sign of benediction with his right hand.  The blessing gesture By Christ with his right hand  is directed towards the earthly group below him and signifies that HE is blessing the entire church.    In His left hand, he may be holding  a scroll, signifying teaching and preaching.  

News from San Antonio Church – May 17, 2020

It appears that the very first possible day that we may resume the Celebration of Mass at San Antonio Church will be May 31st. The State of Ohio advised that there should be no gatherings in churches up until May 29th. and the Catholic Bishops of Ohio agreed We are not sure if we will actually start that day . Please check back on the website for updates.

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons below allow you to make an online donation directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin

by Terrie Evans

On this Sunday,  all the parishioners from San Antonio Church send our congratulations and prayers  to the 3 men who were ordained to the priesthood on Saturday, May 16th.  Those new priests previously served the Archdiocese of Cincinnati as Deacons coming from home parishes  of St. Cecilia, St. Leo and St. Jude.  The first new priest, Christopher Komoroski was born in Arkansas located to Cincinnati with his parents and two sisters at the age of 10 and attended  St. Cecilia Parish.  He became active with the Fellowship of Catholic University Students (FOCUS) while in college which steered him to a devotion to Christ and his becoming a Deacon in the Catholic Church.  Fr. Christopher Komoroski’s favorite prayer is to recite St. Claude de la Colombiere’s “Act of Hope of Confidence in God”. 

The Archdiocese’s second new priest is Benson Lokidiriyo who was born and raised in the remote village of Turkana, Kenya, the eldest of a family of four and along with his younger sister the only Catholics in the family.  He was the only member of his family to attend school attaining a Catholic education through the generosity  of Catholic Missionaries.  He received his Master’s Degree in International Relations from the American University in Nairobi and worked for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) where he met an aid worker who arranged his passage to Cincinnati in 2015.  He enrolled at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary while working out of St. Elizabeth Seton in Milford and became a Deacon at St. Leo the Great Parish serving  the African Refugees, Guatemalan Immigrants, African American and Anglo Communities.  Fr. Benson Lokidiriyo is very appreciative of all those who helped him achieve his dream of becoming a priest and working within the Archdiocese. 

The third new priest, Andrew Reckers  is a Cincinnati born and raised West Sider from  St. Teresa of Avila where he was Baptized  and  Our Lady of Visitation where he attended grade school.  He  graduated from Elder High School  and from the University of Cincinnati with a Degree in Biomedical Engineering before he enrolled in the pre-theology program at St. Mary’s Seminary of the West in 2013.  He has been a parishioner at St. Jude the Apostle Parish for the past 13 years.   Fr. Andrew Reckers considers his Catholic upbringing, his parents, two brothers and sister for encouraging his vocation to become a Deacon and then enter the religious life as a Priest.  Fr. Andrew Reckers appreciates all  the many Priest Advisors who worked with him through his studies especially Fr. Paul Ruwe, his Spiritual Director.  Please keep all of these new priests in your prayers.

Passing of Marleen Steers (nee Cerullo) May 14, 2020

May 12, 1933 ~ May 14, 2020 (age 87)

Marleen Angela Steers (nee Cerullo)
May 12, 1933 – May 14, 2020

We regret to inform you of the passing of Marleen (Cerullo) Steers, a long time member of our San Antonio Church Family. Due to the current pandemic, services will be private. Please keep Marleen’s children Diana, Donna, and Debby and their family and friends in your prayers. Marleen was preceded in death by her husband Ron and their three sons, Dwayne, Dana, and Darrin.

Marleen was an member of the Saint Ann’s Ladies Sodality and was an active member of the craft committee. Marleen had been ill for a number of years and was a resident at Coventry Village. After a cardiac event and a brief stay at Mercy West Hospital, Marleen passed away peacefully with her daughters at her side.

Obituary at Niehard Minges Funeral Home.

Steers, Marlene A. (nee Cerullo), beloved wife of the late Ronald Steers. Loving mother of Diana Michels, Donna (Ted) Richards, Debby (Jim) Still and the late Duane, Dana and Daren Steers. Also survived by 12 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren, numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, staff & friends from Covenant Village. Dear sister of the late Rosie Schneller. Loving daughter of the late Anthony Cerullo and Rose (Stevens) Cerullo. Age 87 years. Marlene was the first female E.M.T. Fire Fighter for the City of Cheviot. She served faithfully from 1976 to 1998. Services will be private. A memorial Mass will be held at a later date. Memorials may be directed to The Cheviot Fire Department, 3814 Harrison Ave. Cheviot, Ohio 45211.

Lunch on the House Resuming 5/12/20

CARRY OUT ONLY!

Our regular lunch schedule (2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month at 11:30 am) will resume on  Tuesday, May 12, 2020 for Carry Out Only.

We hope to be able to resume full service dining in the future, but at this point in order to protect the health of our guests and our workers we must limit access to the Church Hall. 

THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE MUST BE FOLLOWED

  1. Please come to the White Street side of the Church
  2. You must maintain six (6) feet of social distancing
  3. Remain at the marked spots.
  4. You will be called to pick up your carry out lunch and pastries from a table.

NO GUESTS WILL BE PERMITTED TO ENTER THE BUILDING, FOR ANY REASON. 
THE RESTROOMS ARE CLOSED.

News from San Antonio Church – May 10, 2020

It appears that the very first possible day that we may resume the Celebration of Mass at San Antonio Church will be May 31st. The State of Ohio advised that there should be no gatherings in churches up until May 29th. and the Catholic Bishops of Ohio agreed We are not sure if we will actually start that day . Please check back on the website for updates.

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons below allow you to make an online donation directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin

by Terrie Evans

Happy Mother’s Day  to all the women in our lives.  On this day we honor motherhood, maternal bonds, and the influence of mother’s in our society that was first celebrated in 1908 in Grafton, West Virginia.  By 1914, President Woodrow Wilson made a proclamation to the United States Congress as a relevant bill while soon being adopted by some other countries.  In the United Kingdom, honoring mothers is referred to as Mothering Sunday and in Greece it also celebrates the presentation of Jesus Christ to the temple.  In Belgium , Mother’s Day (Moederdag) and in France, (Fetes des Meres) with school children making little presents at their primary schools that will be given to their moms on the morning of Mother’s Day.  In Italy, the first Mother’s Day was celebrated on Christmas Eve in 1933 as the “Day of the Mother and Child”(Giornata della Madre e del Fanciullo) to reward the most prolific Italian women every year.  After World War II in Assisi, the  Parish Priest, Rev. Otello Migliosi initiated the celebration on May 12, 1957.  It became so popular that the Italian Senate made it an official holiday in 1958. 

In the Roman Catholic Church, Mother’s Day is associated with revering the Blesses Virgin Mary with special devotions as  groups  of  grade school children who have just made their First Communion leading the procession.   May Crowning’s  have taken place in many churches and at San Antonio, we have held the May Crowning’s since our church was started in 1922.  Many families will have a special shrine devoted to Mary in their homes and gardens as a way to pay homage to her in May and throughout the year.  On Mother’s Day in Eastern Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches, a special prayer service is held to honor the Theotokos Virgin Mary.  

            Mother’s Day is known as  one of the highest church attendance days after Christmas Eve and Easter.  Many worshipers celebrate the day with carnations with colored ones if the mother is living or white ones if she has passed.   In the United States, Mother’s Day is known for the biggest holiday for long distant calls, sales of fresh flowers and greeting cards.

News from San Antonio Church – May 2, 2020

It appears that the very first possible day that we may resume the Celebration of Mass at San Antonio Church will be May 31st. The State of Ohio advised that there should be no gatherings in churches up until May 29th. and the Catholic Bishops of Ohio agreed We are not sure if we will actually start that day . Please check back on the website for updates.

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons below allow you to make an online donation directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Excerpts from the letter from the Catholic Conference of Ohio

Yesterday, 27 April 2020, Governor Mike DeWine presented a strategy to begin a multi-phased plan, even while the executive “Stay at Home Order” remains in place.

Out of deep concern for the common good as well as the physical and spiritual
well-being of all the people of Ohio, the Catholic Bishops of Ohio have agreed once again to
cooperate with the governor, and to support and abide by the multi-phased approach to returning to work and eventual public gathering in large groups.

To that end, the Catholic Bishops of Ohio extend the temporary suspension of all publicly
celebrated Masses/liturgies ending on May 29th, with the hope of publicly celebrating together the Solemnity of Pentecost on the weekend of May 30/31. Each of the bishops of Ohio, once again, dispense the Catholic faithful who reside in their respective dioceses and all other Catholics currently in their territories from the obligation of attending Sunday Mass during this time. We ask for the cooperation and adherence of all the faithful to the governor’s directives during this period.

(Click here for the full letter)

News from San Antonio Church – May 3, 2020

Contributed by Terrie Evans

On this Sunday, we acknowledge the 57th World day of Prayer for Vocations.  This day is set aside to publicly celebrate  all those who seek  vocations to ordained ministry and religious life in all its forms. For this day, Pope Francis relayed a message  to us concerning the four key words, pain, gratitude, encouragement, and praise as a way to thank priests and support their ministry.  In his letter,  Pope Francis wants those who are called to seek vocations to know  as they  abandon their own security to become one of the Lord’s disciples on this challenging journey,  to realize they are not alone.  For those choosing to enter a religious life are said to have open hearts that will embrace the Love of the Lord and the gratitude from God.  Pope Francis wants us to realize that those seeking vocations will always need encouragement as they move forward  while asking themselves does the Lord really need me to do this?  On this day, the Pope asks all of us to continue to  promote vocations and to  enable  them to discover with gratitude God’s call in their lives and to find courage to say ‘yes’ to God.  In his message,  Pope Francis asked  all those seeking a consecrated a life “ to overcome all weariness through faith in Christ and to make of their lives a song of praise of God, for their brothers and sisters and for thee whole world”. 

On this World Day of Prayer for Vocations,  we pray that parents and grandparents will have the grace to guide their children and grandchildren through the trials of life and to help them discern not just their careers, but also their vocations.  We also pray for and remember all those deceased clergy and   religious Sisters of Charity, Srs. Blandina, Justina, Euphrasia and Sr. Joseph Marion)  who have served San Antonio Church over our 98 year history.   May the Good Shepard welcome them with open arms.   

A Prayer to recite on this day
“Father in Heaven, you sent us your only Son to redeem us and to build your kingdom on earth.  Please give us the wisdom and strength we need to follow His call.  Grant to the faithful a spirit of generosity, that Church vocations may flourish.  Bless our Priests with holiness and courage, that they may lead your people to Christ.  Help all sister and brothers to fulfill their sacred promises and so be effective signs of your kingdom.  Lord, invite more men and women to your service.  We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

News from San Antonio Church – April 26, 2020

Contributed by Terrie Evans

The latest news concerning Sr. Blandina Segale, Servant of God was of the dedication of a Memorial Garden erected in her honor at St. Pius X High School in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This area was where Sr. Blandina did much of her early works especially the adobe two story convent that was built by her and is still standing. The Memorial Garden on the grounds of the  high school built in 1956 serves 936 students in grades 9-12  with their patron saint and mascot, Giuseppe Sarto, Pope Pius X’s birth  name as the school’s Mascot.  The Lombardy, Italian born Giuseppe Sarto (Pope Pius X) embodied the characteristics of charity, good humor, fair play and faithfulness what all the students say what it is to be a Sartan with their Motto: “Teach me goodness, discipline and knowledge” much like the life of Sr. Blandina.  The Italian translation for Sarto  is tailor which is used for the students of St. Pius to instill high ideals to tailor their lives “to restore all things in Christ”.  

The Sr. Blandina memorial  was built  as a way to thank her for the many years  she  ministered to those from their Archdiocese.  The President of St. Pius X High School planned the garden so the students would have a place to pray, be closer to God and learn of the good works of the Sister of Charity that became  known as the “Fastest nun in the West”.  Bishops from Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico reported  of the planned dedication and blessing to the Vatican as they  continue to document findings for  the process for Sr. Blandina’s canonization.  Many donors from the high school and surrounding area  wanted all to know of her tireless work within all levels of society from those in the state legislature to the poor and indigent who needed a voice.  The beautiful statue of Sr. Blandina is the centerpiece of the stone grotto and is flanked by the Blessed Mother and St. Joseph in the large area with ample room for prayer and reflection. 

Many Sisters of Charity were in attendance from the Archdiocese of Santa Fe along with past and present board members of the St. Joseph’s Children’s Home that Sr. Blandina founded.  Also making the journey for the dedication were Sr. Patricia Hayden, President of Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati and Sr. Veronica Buchanan, Archivist of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati.   Archbishop of Santa Fe, New Mexico, John C. Wester conducted the dedication and blessing.  Please continue to pray for and to Sr. Blandina Segale, Servant of God for the needs of San Antonio Church and for her path to sainthood. 

News from San Antonio Church – April 19, 2020

Contributed by Terrie Evans

April 19, 2020

This Sunday we honor the Feast of Divine Mercy and the devotion of Faustina Kowalska, the Polish Nun who reported visions and visitations from Jesus and the conversations she had with him.  During those talks, Jesus asked her to paint the vision of his merciful divinity that poured from his sacred heart. The first divine Mercy image was displayed at Mass on April 28, 1935 with Faustina Kowalska in attendance.  In her writings, Jesus requested that a Divine Mercy Novena should begin on Good Friday.    He also requested that the feast be established on the first Sunday after Easter so that mankind would take refuge in him.  This devotion was promoted by Pope John Paul II and with the Canonization of Faustina Kowalska on April 3, 2000, the feast was established. 

For those practicing a devotion to the Divine Mercy, there are special dispositions for the faithful who are unable to attend church.  Please recite one Our Father and Creed before an image of Jesus while adding “MERCIFUL JESUS, I TRUST IN YOU.”  You will receive a Plenary Indulgence on that day with the condition of fulfilling the usual sacramental requirements at a later date.

With the celebration of Mother’s Day on May 10th, many will now be planting flowers and herbs around a statue of the Blessed Mother for their Mary Garden.  A Mary Garden can be a single indoor pot, or a small corner in your garden with a statue of Mary in the center.  This tradition originated in monasteries and convents throughout medieval Europe among Christian denominations who hold the Virgin Mary in special esteem.  The Irish Patron saint of Gardening, St. Fiacre is said to have planted and tended the first garden dedicated to Mary around the Oratory of Our Lady in France around the 7th Century.  The first Mary Garden open to the public in the United States was in 1932 at St. Joseph’s Church in Massachusetts.  By 1951, A.G. McTeague and John Stokes founded “Mary’s Gardens” in Philadelphia to research flowers identified with Mary.  Their project made available seeds and information on plants for starting a Mary Garden.  The first record of a flower named for Mary is “Seint Mary Gouldes” (St. Mary’s Gold or Marygold) for the Pot Marigold or Calendula from a 1373 English Recipe for a potion to ward off the plague.  The violet is associated with Mary Gardens and became known as “Our Lady’s Modesty” and her humility and is said to have blossomed when Mary replied to the Angel Gabriel, “I am the handmaid of the Lord.“  Irises are also used in Mary Gardens as the blade-shaped foliage recalls the sorrows which “pierced her heart”. 

News from San Antonio Church – April 12, 2020

Contributed by Terrie Evans

Buona Pasqua!  On this Easter Sunday, we commemorate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead.  In the New Testament this was described as having occurred on the third day after His burial and Crucifixion and after the 40-day period of fasting, prayer and penance during Lent.  In Western Christianity with the Gregorian Calendar instituted by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582, Easter always falls on a Sunday Between March 22nd and April 25th  it states that the Resurrection of Jesus is one of the chief tenets of the Christian Faith and establishes Jesus as The Son of God and that God will righteously judge the world.  It shows those who choose to follow Jesus will receive “A new birth into a living hope through the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead”.  It states they will be spiritually resurrected with Him so that they may walk in a new way of life and receive eternal salvation to being physically resurrected to also dwell in the Kingdom of Heaven.  

In Western Christianity, the Easter Season begins on Easter Sunday and lasts seven weeks, ending on the 50th day (Pentecost Sunday, May 31st).  The week which begins on Easter Sunday is referred to as Bright Week during which there is no fasting, even on Wednesday and Friday.  In Eastern Christianity, their season of Pascha begins on Easter Sunday and ends on the 40th day on the Feast of the Ascension (May 24th).  The Liturgical season of Easter is also linked to the Jewish Passover (April 9-16) by symbolism and its position in the calendar.  Those first Christians, Jewish and Gentiles were aware of the Hebrew calendar and the Jewish Christians then timed the observance of Passover to relate to the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus.  

In many European languages, the feast is called by the words for Passover and in the older English versions of the Bible, Easter was the term used to translate Passover.  Easter is linked to Passover from the Exodus from Egypt that is recorded in the Old Testament and from the Last Supper, the sufferings and the Crucifixion of Jesus that preceded the Resurrection.  It is recorded in the New Testament, Jesus giving the Passover Meal a new meaning, as he held the last Supper in the upper room.  He was then preparing himself and his disciples for his death with the matzah and cup of wine referring to his body that would be sacrificed and his blood that would be shed.  In the early Christian community of Mesopotamia, chicken eggs would be stained red in memory of the blood of Christ that was shed at his Crucifixion and for many Christians, the Easter Egg is a symbol of an empty tomb. 

Easter eggs are a popular symbol throughout the world and in Poland and other Slavic countries, a batik-like decorating process, pisanka is used to produce intricate brilliantly colored eggs.  From 1885 to 1916, the well-known House of Faberge created exquisite jeweled Easter eggs for the Russian Imperial Family.  They were made for the Russian Tsars Alexander III and Nicholas II as Easter gifts for their wives and mothers.  There were 69 created with 57 surviving with details and links for more interesting facts on each of the Faberge Eggs Research Site https://fabergeresearch.com/  or Wikipedia article on the eggs at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faberg%C3%A9_egg .