News from San Antonio Church – May 5, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin May 5, 2024

by Terrie Evans

On this Sunday, we send our condolences to the Panaro, Nugent, Werle, Carroll, and Marckesano Families on the passing of Mary Josephine (Panaro) Nugent on Saturday, April 20, 2024, at the age of 98.  She was the oldest of the Panaro siblings born to the late Rose Marckesano and John Panaro who were married at San Antonio Church in 1924.   Mary Josephine’s father, John (1903-1986) was one of the first generation of Italian American siblings along with the late Dena (Panaro) Minella, Eugene, Frank, Anthony, Mary (Panaro) La Rosa Frank, Lawrence, and William born to Josephine Palmieri and Lawrence Panaro who resided at 1998 Queen City Avenue.  Mary Josephine’s mother, Rose (Marckesano) Panaro was one of 10 siblings.  They are the late Jimmy, Anna, Louise, Ralph, Philomena, Jeannie, Nellie, Mary, Susie, born to Maddalena Dalessandro and Pasquale Marckesano.  The Panaro and Marckesano Families were founders and strong supporters of San Antonio Church established in 1922 and celebrated the marriage of their children, with the first wedding held in their first new church building in 1924 (current church was built in 1941).  Josephine Panaro Nugent named for her grandmother Mary Josephine Panaro, grew up in the Little Italy area of the South Fairmount neighborhood near her Panaro, Palmieri, Marckesano, Minella, Dalessandro, Grieco, and Guerrera cousins at the John Panaro homestead on 1926 Horton Street.  Her mother Rose died on April 3, 1947, at the young age of 39, leaving Mary Josephine and her siblings the late Shriley, Delores, Gilda, Joanie, Larry, John, and the youngest Toni (living) and her father to cope without a mother and wife.   

Mary “Mae” Josephine enjoyed bowling with her aunt, Louise Marckesano Studt and was on various teams including her uncle Larry Panaro’s, who sponsored her team when his fruit market was located in Hartwell.  She was a big part of all the Panaro reunions and attended all the monthly Daughters of Josephine (named after Grandma Josephine Panaro) Luncheons with her cousins.  While raising her three children, Judy Werle, the late Raymond Nugent and Diane Carroll, Josephine supported her family working many jobs later retiring from Cincinnati Bell Telephone Company.  She was the revered typical Italian Grandma to Jeff (Julie) Werle, Jenny Camardo (Nick), Jamie Hughes (Brad), the late Dena Nugent, Nicole Carroll, and Courtney Main (Will) and Great Grandma to 13.  She was a member of San Antonio Church throughout her life and many of our current parishioners remember her from attending our events.   Besides her brothers, Larry and Johnny and sister Toni, she also leaves many nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends who are present-day members of our church. 

In January of this year, Mary Josephine (Mae) was interviewed by Bob Herzog from Channel 12 for the next instalment for the canonization of Sr. Blandina Segale, Servant of God where she recalled the memories of our beloved Sister of Charity working among the Italian immigrants in the early days of our church.    Mary Josephine (Panaro) Nugent’s Funeral Mass was held at Our Lady of Victory Church on April 29, 2024.   Please keep her family and many friends in your prayers.                                                   

We also send our sincere condolences to the Ellerhorst and Pugil Families on the passing of Julie Ann Ellerhorst, MD, PhD (1954-2024), one of 7 children born to the late Robert and Marian (Reck) Ellerhorst.  She graduated from St. Ursula Academy in 1972 before moving to Houston, Texas where she attended St. Thomas University, graduating with a BS in Biology.  Before her 30th birthday, Julie received her Medical Degree from Baylor College of Medicine while doing her residency at Baylor.  Julie completed her Ph.D. studies at the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in Houston in 1998, one of the 1st physicians to achieve this milestone working full-time in patient care and cancer research.  Her research involved being a mentor to international colleagues and writing manuscripts for publication.   After the diagnose of Parkinson’s Julie and her husband Gerry relocated back to Houston where she died on April 20, 2024, with her loving husband, Gerry, and beloved rescue dog Hannah at her side.  Beside her loving husband Gerry Pugil, Julie’s siblings Jan (David)Stockton, Cindy (late Daryl) Reed, Gary (Robin) Ellerhorst, D. Peter (Jenny) Ellerhorst, Brian (Rosario) Ellerhorst, and our parishioners, Gregg, and Lisa Ellerhorst.  All of our parishioners from San Antonio Church send their condolences and prayers to the many members of the Ellerhorst Family at this difficult time.                                     

When we celebrate the Month of May, we will be honoring Mary as May is dedicated to her.  Many families will honor her with a special altar set up in their homes, or by saying Rosary or attending May Crownings or Marian Consecrations to honor her.  Pope John Paul II called Mary the “Woman of the Eucharist” because of her important role from the Annunciation to the Cross and to the Resurrection.  When Pope Benedict XVI reminded us that “Mary, living Tabernacle of God made flesh, is the Ark of the Covenant, in whom the Lord visited and redeemed his people.  She was filled with the Holy Spirit when the presence of Jesus was within her, a joy which only he can give. When we welcome Jesus and bring Him to others, this is also the joy of the of Christians and the Church.”  We all hope and pray that Mary, the Woman of the Eucharist, intercedes for us, welcoming her Son into our lives; that we may follow Him and conform ourselves ever more to His holy will.  As we celebrate the month of Mary at San Antonio Church, please remember the May Crowning to be held next Sunday May 12th just before our 9:00 AM Mass.  We are asking for children to participate in the procession and crowning on that morning.  All school-age children, boys and girls are welcome to take part in this yearly tradition that started in the 1930’s.   Please introduce your children or grandchildren to this lovely ceremony at our church; a sign- up sheet will be in the Hall after Mass today.  We will also celebrate Mother’s Day next Sunday with our annual breakfast in the Hall that is open to everyone. 

On Thursday, May 9th we honor the Ascension, one of the great solemnities on the Christian liturgical calendar.  It commemorates the bodily ascension of Christ’s risen and glorified body 40 days after His Resurrection.  This tells us that He exists in corporal form with the father outside time and space, thus the concluding work of redemption and the pledge to all of us our own eventual ascension into heaven.  This is one of the Ecumenical Feasts that is celebrated universally and ranks with the feasts of Passion, of Easter, and Pentecost. 

On Friday, May 10th we have the feast of John of Avila, Priest, Doctor of the Church, and Apostle of Andalusia.  The Spanish priest was also a scholastic author, religious mystic, and renowned preacher for his extensive ministry throughout the region of Andalusia.  At a crossroads in his life, John was inspired by a Franciscan Friar taking his advice to resume his studies in philosophy and theology.  While at the University, John met the noted Dominican Friar Domingo de Soto who also helped him find his life work.   John was ordained in 1526 and celebrated his 1st Mass in the Church where both his parents were buried from.  In 1527, John desired to do foreign missionary work and prepared to travel into Mexico, accompanied by the 1st Bishop of Tlaxcala, the Dominican Friar, Julian Garcia.   While in Seville on his way to his destination, John showed such devotion with his preaching skills while celebrating Mass, he attracted the attention of a local priest who told the Archbishop of Seville of this exceptional young priest.  The Archbishop saw the talents of this young priest and felt John could use his preaching as a powerful tool bringing the faith into Andalusia, persuaded by the Archbishop he decided to stay and preached his first sermon on July 22, 1529.  From that day on crowds filled the churches for all his sermons and for nine years John dedicated himself to missionary work in Andalusia reforming the clergy, establishing schools and colleges in cities, Granada, Baeza, Montilla and Zafra.  John of Avila also served as the first rector at the University of Baeza that was founded in 1538.  John lived with about 20 disciples hoping to establish an order or a formal foundation of apostolic priests. 

When John’s health started to decline, his dream never became a reality and he encouraged his disciples to join the Jesuits with the group of men now totaling 30 joining the Jesuits, the Society of Jesus.  John of Avila spent the last years of his life in the Province of Cordoba where he died on May 10,1569, and was laid to rest there.  The Jesuit Church of the Incarnation is his Major Shrine with the sanctuary dedicated in his honor.  He has been revered by the Jesuits for the work he started and his support for the Society of Jesus.  He was Beatified on November 12, 1893, by Pope Leo XIII and Canonized by Pope Paul VI on May 31, 1970.  On October 7, 2012, on the Feast of the Holy Rosary, Pope Benedict XVI proclaimed him a Doctor of the Church before many thousands of the faithful at St. Peters Square.  During his homily, Pope Benedict said John of Avila was a “Profound expert on the sacred Scriptures, he was gifted with an ardent missionary spirit.  He knew how to penetrate in a uniquely profound way the mysteries of the redemption worked by Christ for humanity.  A man of God, he united constant prayer to apostolic action.  He dedicated himself to preaching and to the more frequent practice of the sacraments, concentrating his commitment on improving the formation of candidates for the priesthood, of religious and of lay people, with a view to a fruitful reform of the Church.”

News from San Antonio Church – April 28, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin April 28, 2024

by Terrie Evans

On this Sunday, we extend our condolences to the Grome, Hartmann, Oaks, and Hubbard Families on the passing of Elizabeth “Betty” (Grome) Hartmann on April 12, 2024, at the age of 93.  Loving Matriarch of Anna Bee, Bill, Angie, and mother- in- law to Shelby, Lois and the late Brenda and Darrell.  Cherished Grandma to 14, Great Grandma to 12 and beloved sister to Robert Grome.  She was a dedicated parishioner of St. Leo the Great and was a regular member of the Rosary and Communion Service every Tuesday at San Antonio Church.  Her funeral was held on April 20, 2024, at St. Leo the Great Church.  Please keep Betty’s family and friends in your prayers. 

We send our thanks to all the men from San Antonio Church for hosting the annual Mussie Fest and Lick Run Reunion on Friday, April 26th in our Hall.  The yearly event was started to keep men from the old neighborhood connected and over the years, brothers, sons, nephews, grandsons, and friends have shared their old and new memories at the evening of good food while supporting San Antonio Church.  We appreciate all the hard work of the men from our church who have shared their dedication to the future of our Little Mission Church. 

On Monday, April 29, we celebrate the feast day of St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) known as an Italian mystic and laywoman who became an advocate not only for the Pope but also in the politics of Italy.  At the age of six, Catherine had a vision of our Lord who appeared and gave her a blessing and from then on, she felt that He wanted her to do something special with her life.  She began to pray for an answer.  Catherine chose to not marry but became a member of the” Mantellates,” a group of holy women devoted to Dominican spiritually.  Catherine decided to give her life to care for the poor, called the Third Order of the Dominicans.  She loved working among the sick and cared for those with the most repellent diseases such as leprosy, at that time incurable.  When a devasting plague broke out, Catherine worked to aid them, even digging the graves, and burying the dead.  Her sound advice and wisdom were sought by civic leaders and the Pope.  At that time, the Popes had been living in France instead of Rome for many years due to unsettled times.  Catherine went to France for a special visit with Pope Gregory XI and when speaking to him said: “Holy Father, God wants the head of His Church to live in Rome.  I pray you will go there as soon as possible.”  Rome again became the home of all future Popes.  When Pope Gregory XI died in 1378, Catherine supported Pope Urban Vi against his opponents and was very loyal to him, even writing letters to princes and cardinals to promote obedience to him.  She tried to convince nobles of his legitimacy meeting with individuals at Pope Urban’s court.  Catherine lived an active and prayerful life following the model of the Dominicans.  On April 21, 1380, Catherine suffered a massive stroke and died 8 days later on April 29th with her last words “Father, into Your Hands I commend my soul and my spirit.”  She was beatified on December 29,1460, and Canonized by Pope Pius II on June 29, 1461.  She is considered one of the outstanding figures of medieval Catholicism because of her strong influence in Church matters and her extensive writings.    Pope Pius IX declared on April 13, 1866, Catherine of Siena co-patroness of Rome and on June 18, 1939, Pope Pius XIII named St. Catherine a joint patron saint of Italy along with Francis of Assisi.   On October 4, 1970, Pope Paul VI named Catherine a Doctor of the Church along with Teresa of Avilia (September 27, 1970) becoming the first women to receive this honor.  St. Catherine is considered the patroness of the Catholic American woman’s fraternity, Theta Phi Alpha and Pope John Paul II made her one of Europe’s Patron Saints along with Teresa Benedicta of the Cross and Bridget of Sweden in 1999.  A prayer in memory of St. Catherine: “O God, You caused St. Catherine to shine with Divine love in the contemplation of the Lord’s Passion and in the service of Your Church.  By her help, grant that Your people, associated in the mystery of Christ, may ever exult in the revelation of His glory.  Amen.”

On Tuesday, April 30th, we celebrate the life of Pope Pius V (1504-1572) born Antonio Ghislieri, ruler of the Papal States from 1566-1572.  He was given the responsibility of getting the Catholic Church back on its feet after being shaken by the reformation causing dissension that was rampant during those years.   Pope Pius V had the task of conducting sweeping reforms called for by the Council of Trent and for the next 18 years, he ordered the founding of seminaries for the proper training of priests, published a new missal, Breviary, and Catechism.  He stablished the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine (CCD) class for young Catholics.  In the Papal Bull of 1570, Regnans in Excelsis, Pope Pius V excommunicated Elizabeth I of England for crimes against Catholics during her reign when she persecuted English Catholics.  After being elected Pope, Pius V wearing his Dominican white habit, canonized one saint, Ivo of Chartres and created 21 Cardinals, including Felice Piergentile who would later become Pope Sixtus V.    He died on May 1,1572 was beatified in 1672 by Pope Clement X and Canonized on May 22, 1712, by Pope Clement XI.  Pope St. Pius V’s Motto: “Oh that my ways may be directed to keep thy justification.” 

On Wednesday, May 1st we celebrate the Memorial of St. Jospeh the Worker in the Catholic Church.  Joseph’s description has been described as an artisan or carpenter working in wood, iron, or stone.   He is also venerated in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican and Lutheran Churches and is regarded as the patron saint of workers and the protector of the Catholic Church.  St. Jospeh is the spouse of the Blessed Virgin, the legal father of Jesus and guardian of the Holy Family.  His role in the Catholic Church is explained by German Theologian, Friedrich Justus Knecht: “St. Joseph’s high place in the Kingdom of God comes from this, that God chose him to be the guardian and protector of His Son, entrusting him with what was greatest and dearest to Himself, singling him out and especially blessing him for this office.”  The Church celebrates a Feast in honor of St. Joseph on 19 March and desires that all the faithful should honor him, ask for his intercession, and imitate his virtues.  St. Joseph is the special patron of the Church.  Even as he was the protector of the Child Jesus on earth, so, we believe, is he know the protector of the mystical Body of Jesus, His Holy Church.  We also seek his intercession for a good death, because, having died so blessedly, in the presence and with the assistance of Jesus and Mary, he should be supplicated to obtain for us from Jesus the grace of a happy death.  Churches, monasteries, and many other institutions are dedicated to him including St. Joseph’s Oratory, the largest Catholic church in Canada with the largest dome of its kind in the world-after St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. 

On Thursday, May 2nd we have the feast day of St. Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria in the year 328.   He was a Church Father and noted Egyptian Christian leader of the 4th Century born into a Christian Family in Alexandria.  He was a Bishop at a time when the Church was split with his enemy’s   accusing him of all kinds of crimes, even murder. He was driven into exile three times, returning only to accept his see once more. He became known as Athanasius Contra Mundum Latin for “Athanasius Against the World.”  After returning to Alexandria, he spent his final years repairing the damage done during those years of violence, dissent, and exile.   His writings were well regarded by Church Fathers in the West and in the East with him being considered one of the 4 Great Eastern Doctors in the Catholic Church.  In Coptic literature, he is the 1st Patriarch of Alexandria to use Coptic as well as Greek in his writings.  His most notable writing is his Festal Letter, written to his Church in Alexandria while in exile when he could not be with them.  “I know moreover that not only this thing saddens you, but also the fact that while others have obtained the churches by violence, you are meanwhile cast out from your places.  For they hold the places, but you the Apostolic Faith.  They are it is true, in the places, but outside of the true Faith; while you are outside the places indeed, but the Faith, within you.  Let us consider whether is the greater, the place or the Faith.  Clearly the true Faith.  Who then has lost more, or who possessed more?  He who holds the place, or he who holds the Faith.”  On May 2, 373 after consecrating Peter II, as his successor, Athanasius died in his bed surrounded by his clergy and many faithful supporters.  It is thought the Athanasian Creed was compiled using his ideas and from his own writings. 

On Thursday, May 2nd is also the 73rd Anniversary of the National Day of Prayer.  Created in 1952 and signed into law by President Harry S. Truman for a national observance to pray for the Nation.   There were other attempts to establish a National Day of Prayer by the 1st Continental Congress in 1775, by Abraham Lincoln in 1863, and amended in 1988 by Ronald Reagan who designated this day for the 1st Thursday in May.  Every President since 1952 have signed a proclamation for a National Day of Prayer.  Since 1775, there have been 1,526 state and federal calls for a National day of Prayer with more added every year.  This day belongs to all Americans as a way to bring citizens together from all backgrounds.  NDP Chairman Mrs. Shirley Dobson states: “We have lost many of our freedoms in America because we have been asleep.  I feel if we do not become involved and support the annual National Day of Prayer, we could end up forfeiting this freedom too.”  The Theme for 2024, Lift up the Word-Light up the World with the Prayer: “For you are my lamp, O Lord, and my God lightens my darkness.  For by You I can run against a troop, and by my God I can leap over a wall.  This God-his way is perfect; the word of the Lord proves true; He is a shield for all those who take refuge in Him.” 

On Friday May 3rd we celebrate the Feast of Sts. Philip and James, the Less both Apostles who are honored on the same day because their relics were transferred to the Church of the Apostles in Rome. Their names are mentioned in the first list in the Canon of the Mass.  St. Philip of Bethsaida was called on by Jesus himself to become His 8th Apostle and was called on soon after the Baptism in the Jordan River.   Philip worked to convert others and had the gift of raising issues that were on everyone’s mind and was remembered for playing a distinct part in the companionship of the Apostles.  At the last Supper, Philip said, “Lord, show us the Father and it is enough for us.”  Philip traveled to Asia Minor where he preached the Gospel and was crucified there in the year 80.  St. James the Just so was called by the nickname so there would be no confusion with the other St.  James the Great who became an Apostle before him.  St. James the Just was a “brethren” or cousin of Our Lord and was a brother of the Apostle Jude and was considered an outstanding figure who then was appointed Bishop of Jerusalem where he was later martyred.  From an incredibly young age he led a life of penance and prayer.    James was given one of the first visions of the Risen Christ and was sometimes referred to as the Brother of Jesus.  After Jesus’ Ascension into heaven, St. James the Just became head of the Church in Jerusalem.  He was martyred at the age of 86 for honoring Christ as the Son of God.  A Prayer in honor of St. Philip and St. James the Less: “O God, who gladden us each year with the feast day of the Apostles Philip and James, grant us, through their prayers, a share in the Passion and Resurrection of your Only Begotten Son, so that we may merit to behold you for eternity. Through Our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, for ever and ever. AMEN.”

News from San Antonio Church – April 21, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin April 21, 2024

by Terrie Evans

On this 4th Sunday of Easter, we celebrate the 61st Anniversary of the World Day of Prayer for Vocations, a day for all of us to promote and invoke special prayers for vocations.  The purpose of this day is to fulfill the Lord’s instruction: “The harvest is abundant that the laborers are few; so, ask the Master of the harvest to send our laborers for his harvest” (Mt 9:37-38).  We hope that our young people receive the call to become followers of Jesus, possibly using their gifts and talents for the priesthood or a religious vocation.  God’s call to a distinctive state of life, married, single, religious life   with the Sacrament of Matrimony and Holy Orders that are designated Sacraments of Vocation.  On this day, we pray for the communities of men and women who have professed solemn vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience and for all those young Seminarians who are candidates for the Priesthood. These young men are working to prepare themselves spiritually, intellectually, and apostolically before becoming sacred ministers for the worship of God and for the sanctification of all people.  When receiving the Sacrament of Holy Orders, one of the Seven Sacraments, the Bishop will pray over those men to confer spiritual power and grace to conduct their ordained ministry of the Church, to be sacred ministers for the worship of God and for the sanctification of all people.  A Prayer for Vocations: “Bountiful Father, your Son Jesus, urged us to pray for laborers for your harvest.  We pray for an abundance of priests and consecrated men and women to care for the needs of your Church.  Through the intercession of Our Lady, Queen of Apostles, pour out your Holy Spirit upon our families.  May we encourage each person to discern and follow the vocations to which you have called them.  We ask through Christ our Lord.  AMEN.”             

On Monday, April 22nd, we celebrate Earth Day, the annual event that was established on April 22, 1970.  The Theme this year is Planet vs. Plastics to promote and support the protection of the environment and for all of us to get involved in community service.  There is also an unofficial Earth Flag “The Blue Marble” taken from a photo taken by the crew of Apollo 17.  On Earth Day, many schools, communities and garden clubs plant trees, flowers, and shrubs in their communities. 

On Saturday, April 27, 2024, the 55th Annual Earth Day will be celebrated in Cincinnati at Summit Park in Blue Ash.  The free event will run from Noon until 5:00PM with over 125 exhibitors highlighting local music, local vegetarian foods, activities, and presentations.  

On Tuesday, April 23rd, we honor the legend of St. George, also known as George of Lydda, venerated as a saint in Christianity who lived during the 3rd Century.  The legend about St. George occurred when a dragon caused panic in the city of Silene, Libya.  To keep the dragon at bay, 2 sheep were sacrificed and when they were not enough, then 4 were sacrificed.  Humans were then offered to calm the dragon with the citizens choosing who would be offered up.  The King’s daughter was then chosen to be sacrificed until George saved the girl by slaying the dragon with a lance.  For his efforts in saving the girl, the King offered George treasures which he used to help the poor.   The legend of the dragon changed the hearts of the town with the residents so appreciative and thankful at what they had witnessed, were baptized, and became Christians.  When George slayed the dragon, his lance was referred to as Ashkelon after the Levantine city in Israel.  During World War II, Winston Churchill used the name Ashkelon for his personal aircraft.  St. George has been venerated as a Military Saint since the Crusades and is highly respected by not only the Christians, the Druze and within some Muslim Communities.  He is considered the patron saint of England, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Ukraine, Malta, Ethiopia, cities in Spain, and Moscow, Russia and is renowned throughout the Middle East with Arab Christians seeking his intercession for an illness or problem at his shrine at Beit Jala in the Christian Quarter in Jerusalem.  He is also the patron saint of Lebanese Christians, Syrian Christians, Lebanese Christians and those Christians in Israel and Palestine.  The Church of Saint George in Lydda, Israel contains a sarcophagus believed to contain the remains of St. George.  George is honored by the Eastern Orthodox Church where he is hailed as a Great Martyr and in the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria in Egypt where he is called the Prince of Martyrs.  In the Church of England George is remembered with a festival on April 23rd every year.  He was beaten and tortured for many years until his martyrdom, and it is said 40,000 pagans converted to Christianity during this time and also, the Empress Alexandra.

On April 23rd we also celebrate Adalbert of Prague a Czech Missionary to the Hungarians, Poles, and Prussians, becoming Bishop of Prague, and a Christian Saint.  He is venerated in the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church and is the patron saint of Poland and the Czech Republic.  He was terribly ill as a child and after he survived this serious illness, his mother and father dedicated him to the service of God.  In 982 at the age of 26, Adalbert was ordained a Catholic Priest and when the Bishop of Prague died, Adalbert was chosen as his successor despite being under canonical age.  He devoted his life to preaching and evangelizing while opposing those Christians who participated in the slave trade.  Adalbert proposed reforms and was met with opposition from those who rejected any reference to God or religion (secularism) and the clergy.  He was forced into exile and for five years he lived as a hermit in the benedictine Monastery of Saint Alexis in Rome.  In 993, Pope John XV requested his return to Prague as a Bishop.  On his return from Rome, Adalbert brought a group of Italian benedictine monks and then founded the Monastery in Brevnov, now the second oldest Monastery on Czech territory.  There was a lot of controversy between Bohemian clans and when Adalbert tried to protect a noblewomen accused of adultery hiding her in a convent.  When she was killed, Adalbert excommunicated the killers and knew he had to flee his archdiocese.  He requested to be an itinerant missionary and set out to preach to the families near Prussia.  He was not well received because of his style of preaching, reading from a book.  The group of Prussians had a society where communication was face to face when conversing.  Adalbert, reading from a book, came off as an evil action and the chieftain of the village struck him on the back of the head with an oar.  When he tried to preach at the next village, the locals called for the death of Adalber and his companions.  Wherever they went they received the same resistance with pagan mobs attacking them.  After saying Mass on April 23, 997, Adalbert along with his companions were attacked and killed by a pagan priest.  He was canonized as Saint Adalbert of Prague a few years after he was martyred with two shrines dedicated to him, the Prague Cathedral, and the Royal Cathedral of Gniezno.  The 1,000th Anniversary of Adalbert’s martyrdom was held on April 23, 1997, in Poland, the Czech Republic, Germany, Russia and many other nations.  To celebrate his life and work, there were representatives from the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Evangelical Churches who made the journey to visit Adalbert’s tomb in Gniezno.  There were heads of seven European Nations when Pope John Paul II visited the Cathedral and celebrated the liturgy as 1,000,000 faithful who attended also participated. 

On Wednesday, April 24th the Catholic Church celebrates the life of Mark Rey who became known as Fidelis of Sigmaringen.  Born in a town in Germany (1577-1622) went on to attend the University of Freiburg teaching philosophy before going on to earn his law degree and   wanted to use his knowledge to help the poor.  He developed a deep devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, visited hospitals and churches all while offering his services as a counselor or advocate to those in need.  Serving those who could hardly pay him Mark- Fidelis became known “as the lawyer of the poor”.  He was a man of high morals and was regarded as a modest and meek man who soon learned that the law profession was not for him.  His brother George was a member of the Capuchin Friars and soon he entered the order taking the religious name Fidelis, Latin for faithful.  After studying for the priesthood, he presided over his 1st Mass at the Capuchin Friary on October 4, 1612, the feast day of St. Francis of Assisi, the founder of the order.  He became Guardian of the Capuchin Friary Weltkirchen, present day Austria where he not only preached and heard confessions but cared for the sick when an epidemic hit the city.  Because of his good works, many people were converted, especially the Calvinists.  The other Calvinists became incensed and threatened his life and those of his companions were with him in his missionary efforts.  He knew his life would end soon and signed his letters to his closest companions “P. Fidelis, prope diem esca vermium “Father Fidelis, in days ahead to become food for worms”.   While he was preaching to those who wanted to convert to Catholicism, Father Fidelis was told to flee for his own safety but was soon confronted by 20 Calvinists who demanded he renounce the Catholic faith Fr. Fidelis said: “I am sent to you to confute, not to embrace your heresy.  The Catholic religion is the faith of all ages, I fear not death.”   When Fr. Fidelis refused, he was beaten with his last words “Pardon my enemies, O lord: blinded by passion they know not what they do.  Lord Jesus, have mercy on me.  Mary, Mother of God, succor me!” After he was slain, Fr. Fidelis was buried the next day.  He was Beatified by Pope Benedict XIII on March 24, 1729, and Canonizes on June 29,1746, by Pope Benedict XIV with his Major Shrine located at the Capuchin friary in Austria. 

On Thursday, April 25th we celebrate the feast day of Mark the Evangelist venerated in all Christian Churches that venerate saints.  Mark who was not an Apostle, was born in Cyrene, in North Africa now Libya.  He was one of the servants at the Wedding Feast at Cana who poured the water that Jesus turned into wine.   Mark was converted by Peter and accompanied him to Rome as an interpreter and wrote about the accounts of Peter’s talks on our Lord’s life and wrote down the sermons of Peter, composing the Gospel according to Mark.   He became the voice of St. Peter reflecting the views of the great Apostle.  His Gospel showed the demands of Jesus on his followers and how Jesus had suffered.  But it also showed that those who can endure such sufferings will be greatly rewarded.   Mark wrote the second Gospels in Greek for those Gentile who converted to Christianity.   Mark the Evangelist was sent on a missionary journey with Paul and Barnabus throughout the island of Cypress, after the Council of Jerusalem and would later be sent to Egypt to establish the Church of Alexandria and later set up the first Christian School.  He was seen as a brilliant Christian who was the first person to write a Gospel and was known to invent this form of religious writing.  He is often depicted writing or holding his Gospel and symbolized by a winged lion and is the patron saint of Notaries.    He died at age 66 in Alexandria, Egypt with his Major Shrine, St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice.  There is also a Mark’s Coptic Orthodox Cathedral located in Alexandria, Egypt.  A Prayer to St. Mark the Evangelist: “God, our Father, You helped St. Mark the Evangelist with Your grace so that he could preach the Good News of Christ.  Help us to know You well so that we may faithfully live our lives as followers of Christ.” St. Mark The Lion, Pray for us!

Today is the last day to make your reservation to “The Mussie Fest”.  Those interested in attending call Dave Sabatelli at 513-405-6444 or email SAQUEENCITY@Gmail.com to reserve your seat $20 per person.

News from San Antonio Church – April 14, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin April 14, 2024

by Terrie Evans

On this Sunday, we celebrate the Third Sunday of Easter in the traditional Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.  Also referred to as Good Shepherd Sunday due to the Gospel reading assigned to it with an image that depicts God as the kind of shepherd who cares for his flock.   In some liturgical calendars, this Sunday was at one time known as the Feast of Our Lady, Mother of the Good Shepherd with the Franciscans celebrating this day as the Feast of the Holy Sepulchre.  In the Greek Orthodox Church, Eastern Orthodox and Greek Catholic Churches, this day is called the Sunday of the Myrrh-bearers for the role of the women who followed Jesus during his earthly ministry and remained with him during his arrest, execution, crucifixion, and burial.  They were mentioned in the New Testament who were directly involved and the first to pay a visit to the tomb of Christ in the early morning to find it empty after the Resurrection.  According to Jewish tradition, the women returned to the tomb every day for 3 days for brief burial preparations before waiting for the Sabbath to pass, then returned to anoint the body with myrrh.  When the Resurrection was revealed to them, they told the Apostles of finding the tomb empty.  The myrrh bearing women, especially Mary Magdalene is considered as the apostle to the Apostles.  In Western Christianity, they are called Women at the Tomb with several prominent Orthodox Cathedrals and Churches named in honor of the Myrrh-bearers.  In the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church, they are celebrated with a feast day for the “Myrrh-bearing Women on August 3rd.    

On Tuesday, April 16th we observe the feast day of Bernadette Soubirous (1844-1879) known for experiencing the apparitions of the young woman who asked for a chapel to be built at the nearby grotto where she visited Bernadett.  The visions seen by Bernadett began in 1858 when she was 14 with the Virgin Mary appearing to her at a grotto near her home in France.  There were 18 appearances of Our Lady to Bernadette in 1858 between February 11th and July 16th at the rock cave located along the River Gave near Lourdes, France.  She was dressed in blue and white with roses at her feet and asked Bernadett to pray to the Rosary with her.   In the final vision to Bernadette, the Blessed Mother would finally reveal her identity “I am the Immaculate Conception” and then instructed her to drink from the natural spring that began to flow from the place of the apparitions.  Bernadette Soubirous reports were then reported and after a canonical investigation, the visons were then declared believable with the Marian apparition that came to Bernadette, named Our Lady of Lourdes.  In 1862, Lourdes became a place of pilgrimage with the approval of the Church and in 1864, a statue of the Virgin according to Bernadette’s description was placed in the grotto and dedicated in the presence of 20,000 pilgrims. 

In 1866, at the age of 22, Bernadette professed her vows with the Sisters of Charity at their convent in Nevers, France taking the name Marie Bernarde in honor of her Grandmother.  In 1876, Pope Pius IX granted an official decree of Canonical Coronation to the image as Notre-Dame du Saint Rosaire performed by Cardinal Pier Francesco Meglia in the courtyard before the Rosary Basilica was built.  Bernadette, Sr. Marie Bernard   worked as an assistant in the infirmary and as a sacristan until her death on Easter Wednesday on April 16th in 1879 at the age of 35.  In 1901, the Basilica of the Holy Rosary was completed with Lourdes becoming one of the most popular sites of pilgrimages for healings that have been reported after bathing in the waters of the spring or during the blessing ceremonies with the Blessed Sacrament at the Basilica.   On June 14, 1925, Bernadette, was beatified by Pope Pius XI and canonized by him on December 8, 1933, with her Major Shrine, the Chapel of the St. Gildard Convent in Nevers, France where her remains are buried.    Over the years, the Marian devotion became popular with the image of Our lady of Lourdes copied in shrines, for homes and in garden landscapes.  In 1941, a novel, the Song of Bernadete by Franz Werfel was published about the events of the apparition and in 1943, a film was made from the bestselling book.  All recent Popes have visited the Marian Shrine with Benedict XV, Pius XI and John XXIII making their pilgrimage as Bishops.  Pope Pius XII visited as a Papal Delegate and issued an encyclical, Le pelerinage de Lourdes on the 100th Anniversary of the apparitions in 1958.  Pope John Paul II visited Lourdes three times, twice as a Bishop, and also instituted the World Day of the Sick on May 13, 1992, in honor of Our Lady of Lourdes. 

In 2008, Pope Benedict visited Lourdes to commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Marian apparitions.  In 2019, Pope Francis granted a canonical coronation towards a Lourdes image at the National Shrine at Our Lady of Lourdes in Quezon City in the Philippines that took place on August 22, 2020.  There are other places of veneration to Our Lady of Lourdes at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, the Internal grotto of The Church of Notre Dame in New York City, Mount Saint Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Maryland, the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville, Alabama, with many other located around the world.  The Catholic Church has formally endorsed Lourdes as a place for those who are ill to visit and bathe in the waters for healing and a possible cure.  Many pilgrims are said to be cured by drinking or bathing in the spring waters who are provided for anyone who asks for it free of charge.  The water was deemed pure and inert and is said to contain many minerals.    A Prayer in honor of St. Bernadette: “O God, protector, and lover of the humble, You bestowed upon Your servant, Bernadette, the favor of beholding the Immaculate Virgin Mary and of talking with her.  Grant that we may deserve to behold You in heaven.” 

On Friday, April 26, 2024, the Men from San Antonio Church will hold their annual Mussie Fest in our Church Hall.    The evening will begin with all the men coming together for a traditional Italian dinner in our Hall.  The Annual Mussie Fest and Lick Run Reunion will take place on Friday, April 26th.  Doors will open at 5:00PM for this historic event open to all men who support San Antonio Church.  The tickets are $20.00 per person for an evening of great food and fellowship so, please invite your friends.  There are only 125 available seats in our Hall, reservations can be made by calling Dave Sabatelli at 513-405-6444.  There will be a signup sheet in the Hall this Sunday for this great event that brings all our families closer together.

News from San Antonio Church – April 7, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin April 7, 2024

by Terrie Evans

On this Sunday, we celebrate the Third Sunday of Easter in the traditional Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.  Also referred to as Good Shepherd Sunday due to the Gospel reading assigned to it with an image that depicts God as the kind of shepherd who cares for his flock.   In some liturgical calendars, this Sunday was at one time known as the Feast of Our Lady, Mother of the Good Shepherd with the Franciscans celebrating this day as the Feast of the Holy Sepulchre.  In the Greek Orthodox Church, Eastern Orthodox and Greek Catholic Churches, this day is called the Sunday of the Myrrh-bearers for the role of the women who followed Jesus during his earthly ministry and remained with him during his arrest, execution, crucifixion, and burial.  They were mentioned in the New Testament who were directly involved and the first to pay a visit to the tomb of Christ in the early morning to find it empty after the Resurrection.  According to Jewish tradition, the women returned to the tomb every day for 3 days for brief burial preparations before waiting for the Sabbath to pass, then returned to anoint the body with myrrh.  When the Resurrection was revealed to them, they told the Apostles of finding the tomb empty.  The myrrh bearing women, especially Mary Magdalene is considered as the apostle to the Apostles.  In Western Christianity, they are called Women at the Tomb with several prominent Orthodox Cathedrals and Churches named in honor of the Myrrh-bearers.  In the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church, they are celebrated with a feast day for the “Myrrh-bearing Women on August 3rd.    

On Tuesday, April 16th we observe the feast day of Bernadette Soubirous (1844-1879) known for experiencing the apparitions of the young woman who asked for a chapel to be built at the nearby grotto where she visited Bernadett.  The visions seen by Bernadett began in 1858 when she was 14 with the Virgin Mary appearing to her at a grotto near her home in France.  There were 18 appearances of Our Lady to Bernadette in 1858 between February 11th and July 16th at the rock cave located along the River Gave near Lourdes, France.  She was dressed in blue and white with roses at her feet and asked Bernadett to pray to the Rosary with her.   In the final vision to Bernadette, the Blessed Mother would finally reveal her identity “I am the Immaculate Conception” and then instructed her to drink from the natural spring that began to flow from the place of the apparitions.  Bernadette Soubirous reports were then reported and after a canonical investigation, the visons were then declared believable with the Marian apparition that came to Bernadette, named Our Lady of Lourdes.  In 1862, Lourdes became a place of pilgrimage with the approval of the Church and in 1864, a statue of the Virgin according to Bernadette’s description was placed in the grotto and dedicated in the presence of 20,000 pilgrims. 

In 1866, at the age of 22, Bernadette professed her vows with the Sisters of Charity at their convent in Nevers, France taking the name Marie Bernarde in honor of her Grandmother.  In 1876, Pope Pius IX granted an official decree of Canonical Coronation to the image as Notre-Dame du Saint Rosaire performed by Cardinal Pier Francesco Meglia in the courtyard before the Rosary Basilica was built.  Bernadette, Sr. Marie Bernard   worked as an assistant in the infirmary and as a sacristan until her death on Easter Wednesday on April 16th in 1879 at the age of 35.  In 1901, the Basilica of the Holy Rosary was completed with Lourdes becoming one of the most popular sites of pilgrimages for healings that have been reported after bathing in the waters of the spring or during the blessing ceremonies with the Blessed Sacrament at the Basilica.   On June 14, 1925, Bernadette, was beatified by Pope Pius XI and canonized by him on December 8, 1933, with her Major Shrine, the Chapel of the St. Gildard Convent in Nevers, France where her remains are buried.    Over the years, the Marian devotion became popular with the image of Our lady of Lourdes copied in shrines, for homes and in garden landscapes.  In 1941, a novel, the Song of Bernadete by Franz Werfel was published about the events of the apparition and in 1943, a film was made from the bestselling book.  All recent Popes have visited the Marian Shrine with Benedict XV, Pius XI and John XXIII making their pilgrimage as Bishops.  Pope Pius XII visited as a Papal Delegate and issued an encyclical, Le pelerinage de Lourdes on the 100th Anniversary of the apparitions in 1958.  Pope John Paul II visited Lourdes three times, twice as a Bishop, and also instituted the World Day of the Sick on May 13, 1992, in honor of Our Lady of Lourdes. 

In 2008, Pope Benedict visited Lourdes to commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Marian apparitions.  In 2019, Pope Francis granted a canonical coronation towards a Lourdes image at the National Shrine at Our Lady of Lourdes in Quezon City in the Philippines that took place on August 22, 2020.  There are other places of veneration to Our Lady of Lourdes at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, the Internal grotto of The Church of Notre Dame in New York City, Mount Saint Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Maryland, the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville, Alabama, with many other located around the world.  The Catholic Church has formally endorsed Lourdes as a place for those who are ill to visit and bathe in the waters for healing and a possible cure.  Many pilgrims are said to be cured by drinking or bathing in the spring waters who are provided for anyone who asks for it free of charge.  The water was deemed pure and inert and is said to contain many minerals.    A Prayer in honor of St. Bernadette: “O God, protector, and lover of the humble, You bestowed upon Your servant, Bernadette, the favor of beholding the Immaculate Virgin Mary and of talking with her.  Grant that we may deserve to behold You in heaven.” 

On Friday, April 26, 2024, the Men from San Antonio Church will hold their annual Mussie Fest in our Church Hall.    The evening will begin with all the men coming together for a traditional Italian dinner in our Hall.  The Annual Mussie Fest and Lick Run Reunion will take place on Friday, April 26th.  Doors will open at 5:00PM for this historic event open to all men who support San Antonio Church.  The tickets are $20.00 per person for an evening of great food and fellowship so, please invite your friends.  There are only 125 available seats in our Hall, reservations can be made by calling Dave Sabatelli at 513-405-6444.  There will be a signup sheet in the Hall this Sunday for this great event that brings all our families closer together.

News from San Antonio Church – March 31, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin March 31, 2024

by Terrie Evans

Buona Pasqua! On this Easter Sunday, we honor the feast of the Resurrection of Christ the high point of the Christian year and is a day of celebration, rebirth, and new life.  In some churches, the Easter service will begin with the Paschal greeting: “Christ is risen! With a response: “He is risen indeed. “Alleluia”.   According to St. Bede the Venerable, Easter derives its name from Eastre, the goddess of spring.  Easter is also referred to as Pascha or Resurrection Sunday described in the New Testament occurring on the third day of His burial following His Crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary, 30AD.  His triumph over death and the cross in His Resurrection, which in the Synoptic Gospels is associated with the Jewish Passover as both the Crucifixion and the Resurrection took place during the week of Passover.  In European languages, the Christian Easter and the Jewish Passover are referred to by the same name and in the old English versions of the Bible, the term Easter was used to translate Passover or Pasch. 

In Medieval times, the Pasch was considered as a symbolic type of Christ’s sacrifice on the cross and the Eucharistic Sacrifice.  In the First Epistle of Peter, he declares that God has given those who believe “A new birth into a living hope through the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.”  The Risen Christ is seen as the “first fruits of those who have fallen asleep” (1 Cor 15:20) and so is the model for the bodily resurrection of all the faithful on the last day.  It is believed that those who live and die with Christ and when Christ comes again, they will appear with Him in glory (Col 3:3-4).  It is believed that those who follow Jesus will be spiritually resurrected with Him, walk in a new way of life, receive eternal salvation, and with hope, dwell with Him in the Kingdom of Heaven.   

On this Sunday, we light the new Paschal Candle symbolizing the light of Christ rising in glory that rids the darkness of sin and death.  Our Paschal Candle has a Cross, Alpha, the beginning, and Omega the end, and the current year on it.  There are grains of incense and wax nails implanted at the ends of the crossbars and in the center of the cross.  The candle will be lit during the fifty days of the Easter Season until after Pentecost and then will be placed on the side of our altar and will only be lit for newly Baptized infants and for the Masses of Christian Burials.  On Easter Sunday many traditions or symbols are used every year such as decorating the altar with Easter lilies, or colored eggs, a custom that originated in the early Christian community of Mesopotamia.  Those eggs were stained red in memory of the blood of Christ that was shed at His Crucifixion, with the egg as a symbol of an empty tomb.  Easter Sunday is a public Holiday in Italy with many families waiting many hours to be a part of   Pope Francis’ Easter Mass at 10:15 AM in St. Peter’s Square.  After the Mass, the Pope will come out on the Central Loggia of St. Peter’s Square to deliver his blessing, saying, Urbi et Orbi “To the City and the World”.  The Pope gives this blessing only twice a year, at Christmas and Easter.  The main celebrations taking place in Rome for Easter are broadcast on the Vatican’s Official YouTube Channel Online. 

The week following Easter Sunday is referred to as Easter Week or the Octave of Easter, with each day, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday prefaced with Easter.  Easter Monday is called Pasquetta or Little Easter with the Pope making his Easter Monday address at noon on St. Peter’s Square.  Also called Luned dell Angelo “Monday of the Angel” part of the season of Eastertide or Paschaltide that begins on Easter Sunday and lasts until Pentecost Sunday, May 19th, 7 weeks later.  To determine a universal date for Easter, the Anglican Communion, Coptic Orthodox, Greek Orthodox, and the Roman Catholic Churches considered agreeing to simplify the calculation of that date for Easter choosing either the second or third Sunday in April as popular choices.  In 2022, there were conversations between the Patriarch of Constantinople, the Roman Catholic Church, and the Orthodox Churches to choose a common date for the celebration of Easter.  They are hopeful an agreement can be reached in 2025 for the 1700th Anniversary of the Council of Nicaea to be held that year.

News from San Antonio Church – March 24, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin March 24, 2024

by Terrie Evans

Palm Sunday, March 24th marks the beginning of Holy Week and the last week of the solemn liturgical season of Lent leading up to Easter.  This day commemorates the triumphant day when Jesus entered Jerusalem with crowds of people greeting him laying palm branches at his feet. Palm Sunday is celebrated with blessing and distribution of palm branches to represent the palms that were laid before Christ as he rode a donkey, considered an animal of peace, into Jerusalem.  In history, it was customary to cover the path of someone who was thought to be honored and held in the highest esteem.   In the Christian tradition, the palms will be taken to their homes and will be placed next to Christian art, kept in Bibles, or affixed to a patron saint.   In countries where palms are not available, substitutes such as box, olive, or yew may be used.  In some regions of Germany, long branches of pussy willow or other twigs are used and in Ireland, silver fir, spruce, or cypress can be substituted with Palm Sunday referred to as Yew Sunday.  In Italy, olive branches are used along with palm leaves that will be placed above their front doors.  In some churches, the priest will take an olive branch and dip it in Holy Water for blessing the congregation. In Belgium, Palm Sunday Processions will be held with the Twelve Apostles leading the townspeople while carrying a wooden statue of Christ as children go door to door offering their long branches for coins to be given to the church.  

On Palm Sunday, Pope Francis will hold a special Mass at 9:30AM at St. Peters Square, Vatican City to Bless the Palms.  In ancient times, palm branches were symbols of goodness and victory and were often displayed on buildings or stamped on coins.  At the end of the Bible, people from every nation were seen honoring Jesus by raising palm branches.   The Station Church in Rome for Palm Sunday is St. John Lateran, the mother church of Roman Catholicism worldwide.  It is the highest ranking and oldest among the great Papal Basilicas of Rome.  Located outside Vatican City, it was consecrated in 324 by Pope Sylvester I and it was where the Lateran Treaty was signed in 1929 which established Vatican City as an independent State and Catholicism as the official religion of Italy.           

Holy Monday, March 25th is the second day of Holy Week after Palm Sunday as we prepare for Easter Sunday.  Some of the events that occurred on this day was Jesus’ pleading with the fig tree for bearing no fruit.  This scene was   directed at the Jews who did not accept Jesus, symbolizing the fig tree failing to produce the fruit of righteousness (Matthew 21:18-22) (Mark11:20-26).  Another event was the Cleansing of the Temple referring to Jesus’ reaction to the money changers cheating people when he expelled the merchants and money changers from the Temple.  The money changers in the Temple were there to convert the many currencies to use for the accepted currency to pay Temple Taxes.  The cleansing of the Temple is a commonly depicted event in the Life of Christ and those who questioned   Jesus’ authority, (Matthew 21:23-27) all taking place before His entry into Jerusalem. 

On March 26th, Holy Tuesday, it is believed Jesus announced that he knew the time of His suffering and death.  Also called Great and Holy Tuesday, it commemorates the Parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13) with the theme of Christ as the Bridegroom of the Church.  The bridal chamber is used as a symbol for the Tomb of Christ. 

On March 27th, we commemorate Holy Wednesday or Spy Wednesday to recall the clandestine spy Judas seated among the Disciples.  On this day, Judas betrayed Jesus with plans to hand Him over to Temple authorities when Jesus was in Bethany at the house of Simon the Leper at a supper table along with his disciples. It was then that a woman named Mary anointed Jesus’ head and feet with a very costly oil that could be sold with the money given to the poor, but   Judas wanted to sell the oil and keep the money.  This was then Judas decided to betray Jesus by offering Jesus to the Sanhedrin in exchange for money.  The Sanhedrin was the highest court and governing council with 71 members of the ancient Jewish nation presided over by the high priest of the Temple.   Judas, the spy among the disciples chose Wednesday to betray Christ.  The traditional Tenebrae (darkness) service is held on Holy Wednesday, but if you are not able to attend church, you can have a Tenebrae (Darkness) service in your own home.  The service involves gradually extinguishing 13 candles by reading Matthew 26:14-25 aloud and pausing at   the end of each verse, to extinguish one candle.  When you get to the end, one candle will still be lit with this last candle symbolizing the light of Christ. 

On March 28th, Maundy or Holy Thursday, this day commemorates the Washing of the Feet, practiced among many Christian groups.  Holy Thursday is also the Last Supper with Jesus and the Apostles and to celebrate the Sacrament of Holy Communion, instituted by Jesus on this night.  The title Maundy comes from the Latin word commandment to reflect Jesus’ words “I give you a new commandment.”  This introduces us to the Paschal Triduum for the days that commemorate the Passion, Death, and Resurrection of Jesus.  In Roman Catholicism, the Chrism Mass is celebrated in each diocese, usually at the Cathedral as a celebration for priests, ministers, and deacons to renew the promises made at their ordination.  It was on the night of Holy Thursday that Jesus instituted the Priesthood and the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.  Those also present at the Chrism Mass are called on to renew their baptismal promises.  Chrism takes its name from the holy oils, olive or vegetable oils consecrated by a Bishop for use in liturgical anointings at Baptisms, Confirmation, Holy Orders, the blessing of an altar, and in olden days, the coronation of a king.  These holy oils to be used in the sacraments throughout the year will be given to priests to take back to their parishes.  The term Holy Thursday is more commonly used in Ireland, Scotland, Canada, and the United States where it is used in its modern English language liturgical books.   In countries around the world there is the tradition of visiting 7 or more churches on Holy Thursday, a practice that originated in Rome.  In Malta, Holy Thursday is known as Communion Thursday with the tradition of visiting 7 churches called “is-seba’ visiti”.   In India, the custom is to visit 14 churches on the evening of Maundy Thursday a tradition many   families have done on the Thursday before Easter.  In the Philippines. Holy Thursday is called Visita Iglesia, as the faithful will visit churches for prayer and recite the stations of the Cross.   Many churches cover their statues and crucifixes with purple cloths during the last 2 weeks of Lent, Passiontide.  For Holy Thursday, white covers can be used on the statues instead of the very somber purple. 

On March 29th we solemnly honor Good Friday, the day that commemorates the Passion and Death of Christ for the salvation of the world.  It is observed during Holy Week as a Part of the Paschal Triduum with fasting and church services.  The Service of the Great Three Hours Agony is held from noon until three as Jesus sacrificial death on the cross in the Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican and Methodist Churches.  The day is set aside for worship services, prayer fasting and almsgiving and in the Moravian Church, a tradition if for the members to clean the headstones in the Moravian Cemeteries.  The afternoon liturgy on Good Friday is called “The Celebration of the Lord’s Passion “and consists of the Liturgy of the Word, Veneration of the Cross, and Holy Communion.  The Liturgy of the Word takes place when the clergy and those assisting ministers enter in complete silence and make a full prostration to symbolize the grief and sorrow of the Church.   Afterwords, special intentions will be said with those in attendance kneeling for a short private prayer.  Then the veneration of the Cross will take place as it is laid near the altar to be honored by the whole congregation kneeling to kiss the Cross.  For the final part of the Mass the Eucharist, consecrated on Holy Thursday, is distributed.  Afterwards, the priest and the congregation will depart in silence, the altar cloth will   be removed leaving the altar bare and it is customary to empty the holy water fonts to prepare for the blessing of the water at the Easter Vigil. 

On Holy Saturday, March 30th, the Sacraments are not celebrated on this day except the Sacrament of Penance and the emergency administration for Anointing the sick.  On this day, the Church keeps vigil at the Tomb of Our Savior.  The Office of Readings and Morning Prayer are celebrated with Midday Prayer and Vespers also are celebrated.  The Easter Vigil will begin at sundown.  Also called Joyous Saturday, it is the final day of Holy Week.

News from San Antonio Church – March 17, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin March 1714, 2024

by Terrie Evans

On this 5th Sunday of Lent as we get closer to Easter Sunday it was once referred to as Passiontide before the revision of the Liturgical Calendar at Vatican II, the focus is still centered on the events leading up and commemorates the Lord’s Passion and death.  Since the revision of the General Roman Calendar in 1969, the term Passiontide is no longer used for the last two weeks of Lent although it is observed in the Church of England and in provinces of the Anglican Communion.  Pope John XXIII’s Code of Rubrics in 1960 changed the name of the 5th Sunday of Lent to the First Sunday of the Passion with the next Sunday becoming the Second Sunday of the Passion or Palm Sunday.  The Station Church for this Sunday is San Pietra in Vaticano, St. Peters in the Vatican in Rome.  The original church built in 40 AD was erected by Emperor Caligalia on the site of the Roman Circus.  It is considered the heart of the Roman Church, and it is where St. Peter was crucified upside down because he felt he was not worthy to die the same way as Jesus and is buried there.  St. Peter’s is known for the relics that are in the possession of the Basilica.  There are reliquaries for the main relics and statues of St. Longinus with the Holy Spear, St. Andrew with his cross, St. Helena with the True Cross, and the most prestigious, St. Veronica with the relic of the Veil of Veronica. 

The story of Veronica comes from the history of the early church.   According to pious tradition, St. Veronica was a poor woman who Jesus had cured and as he walked the Via Dolorossa (The Sorrowful Path) on the way to His Crucifixion, she wiped the face of Jesus.  When she met Him again and Veronica wiped his face as he fell under the weight of the cross and miraculously, left his physical image on the face of the cloth.  During the Crusades, “a Veil of Veronica” was brought to Rome from Jerusalem in the 8th Century on the request of Pope Boniface VIII with the likeness highly venerated since the end of the 10th Century.  In 1207 the veil was publicly processed and displayed and during the 1st Holy Year in 1300, the Veil of Veronica was one of the Mirabilia Urbis (marvels of the city of Rome) displayed to pilgrims when they visited St. Peter’s Basilica.  The image was misplaced in the 17th Century with copies of the image turning up in France until the True Image was located hidden in a relic chamber and then shown every Passion Sunday to commemorate the final two weeks before Easter Sunday.  As bells toll, Vespers will be celebrated with the exposition to the faithful of the Veil of Veronica in the niche above her statue along with other relics shown on the 5th Sunday of Lent.  The veil is kept hidden in a special chapel in St. Peter’s Basilica and shown to the world only on Passion Sunday.   Some believe the image is not located at St. Peter’s Basilica but in the Church of the Holy Face in Manoppello, in northern Italy.  Pope Benedict XVI was the first Pontiff since 1606, 400 years ago, when he visited the image in 2006.  The gesture of Veronica’s compassion for Calvary is shown on the 6th Station of the Cross. 

Veronica comes from “Vera Icona” meaning the True Image of Jesus when in 1844, visions of Jesus appeared to Marie of St. Peter, a Carmelite nun living in tours, France who started a devotion to the Holy Gace of Jesus.  In her visions, it showed Veronica wiping away the mud and spit from the face of Jesus as he requested Sr. Marie establish a devotion to His Holy Face in reparation for the acts of sacrilege and blasphemy done to Him.  Those Acts of Reparation to Jesus Christ will then be compared to the Veronicas kindness by wiping the face of Jesus.  Pope Leo XIII approved the Devotion to the Holy Face of Jesus in 1885.  The Veronica Veil Holy Face Prayer: “Eternal Father, We offer You the Holy Face of Jesus, covered with blood, sweat, dust and spittle, in reparation for the crimes of communists, blasphemers, and for the profanes of the Holy Name and of the Holy Day of Sunday. Amen.”    

This Sunday is also the feast day of St. Patrick, the Patron Saint of Ireland who was thought to have brought Christianity to Ireland.  He was born in Britain in 387 and was taken to Ireland at 16 by Irish Raiders He spent to work as sheep herder.   He spent 6 years working as a shepherd praying to God for help to return home.  The answer from God was to flee to the coast where a ship would be waiting to take him home for his mission to become a priest.  Patrick would use the next years of his life evangelizing in Northern Ireland that would convert thousands.  He became known as a 5th Century Romano-British Christian Missionary and Bishop of Ireland.  He would stay in Ireland preaching, Baptizing those faithful, and building churches throughout the country.  When asked by a pagan King to speak about his God, he said:  “There is but one God, and the Three Divine Persons; The Father, The Son, and The Holy Spirit”  He then picked up a shamrock saying:  “Even as there are three leaves on this one stem, so there are three persons in one God.”   St. Patrick died on March 17, 461 and has been celebrated since the 9th Century where in Ireland this day is celebrated as a public holiday.  

The first St. Patrick’s Day celebration was held in 1600 by St. Augusten who had traveled from Ireland to the Americas to visit an Irish priest Richard Arthur, and Irish soldiers in St. Augustine, Florida.  In the 1600’s St. Patrick’s Feast day was added to the calendar of the Catholic Church because of the influence of the Waterford born Franciscan scholar, Luke Wadding.  In Ireland, St. Patrick’s Day is considered the middle of spring with the weather improving for the planting of potatoes by farmers.   In 1737, Irish Soldiers in the English Military marched in celebration of St. Patrick in Boston, Massachusetts and in 1762 they would march in New York City.  In 1848, New York City held its first St. Patrick’s Day Parade complete with bag pipes and drums.  In Ireland, the first state sponsored St. Patrick’s Day took place in Dublin in 1931.  The week around St. Patrick’s Day is referred to as Seachtain na Gaeilge or Irish Language Week with Irish language events being held to promote the use of the language.  Since 1962 in Chicago, their river is dyed green and since 2010, famous landmarks in Ireland have been lit up to “Go Green for St. Patrick’s Day.  There are 300 landmarks in 50 countries that will go green for the day.  The Irish Prime Minister will meet with the President of the United States around St. Patrick’s Day to present a Waterford Crystal Bowl filled with Shamrocks, a tradition that began in 1952 when the Irish Ambassador to the U.S. sent a box of Shamrocks to President Harry S. Truman.  Shamrocks will be presented by the British Royals to the Irish Guards, a regiment in the British Army, a tradition started in 1901 with the first presentation by Queen Alexandra.  A Prayer in honor of St. Patrick: “O, God, You sent St. Patrick to preach Your glory to the Irish people.  Through his merits and intercession grant that we who have the honor of bearing the name of Christians may constantly proclaim Your wonderful designs to men.  Amen.”   

On Monday, March 18th, we honor the feast of Cyril of Jerusalem, Bishop, Confessor and Doctor of the Church.  Born in 313, he was considered a theologian of the Early Church and was exiled on more than one occasion for the policies of various Emperors.  He was known as a preacher and liturgist who was ordained a Deacon in 335, a Priest 8 years later, then Bishop of Jerusalem.  His writings contain the loving and forgiving nature of God and wrote of the healing power of forgiveness of the Holy Spirit.  Cyril wrote: “The Spirit comes gently and makes himself known by his fragrance.  He is not felt as a burden for God is light very light.  Rays of light and knowledge stream before him as the Spirit approaches.  The Spirit comes with the tenderness of a true friend to save, to heal, to teach, to counsel, to strengthen to console.”  During his life, Cyril was disgraced and forced to leave his position and his people behind but never showed any bad will to those who wronged him.  He lived the words he wrote about forgiveness.  He is venerated as a Saint in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and the Oriental and Anglican Communion Churches.  He died in 386 at the age of 73 and in 1883, was declared Doctor of the Church by Pope Leo XIII.  A Prayer to St. Cyril: “O God of Our Father, and Lord of Mercy, who has made all things with your word, and ordained man through your wisdom, that he should have dominion over the creatures which you have made, give me wisdom that sits by your throne so that I might understand what your will is and be saved. For I am Your servant. AMEN.”

On Tuesday, March 19th, the Catholic Church honors and celebrates St. Joseph’s Day, a major holiday for Italian Americans especially those of Sicilian Descent.  In the Middle Ages, there was a severe and devasting drought which caused famine, suffering and starvation.  Everyone prayed to St. Joseph for help to end this suffering with the promise to thank him with a great feast.  Their prayers to him were answered and an enormous feast was prepared in his honor for all to enjoy, especially for the poor and needy who all had seats at their banquet table.  The Heavenly father chose Joseph, a young carpenter of Nazareth to be the father figure to Jesus and the husband of the Blessed Virgin Mary.   St. Joseph was blessed with a vision of an angel of God saying, “Do not fear to take Mary as your wife.  That which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit.  She will bear a son and you will call his name Jesus.”  He shared all the anxieties of a parent like the time when Jesus, who was presumed lost after their visit to the Temple in Jerusalem.  Because of much devotion to St. Joseph for his role in the Holy Family, in Italy, the holiday is also considered the Italian Father’s Day, known as Festa de San Giuseppe. 

Many Italians throughout Italy attend Mass to give thanks to St. Jospeh for answering their prayers and asking him to help them be better and more giving persons especially to those less fortunate.  On St. Joseph’s day many will do a service project, volunteer at a hospital, or give to the poor or charity with a donation in his name.  Parades will take place in many towns with the Holy Family:  Mary, Joseph, and Jesus portrayed by local people leading the procession.   When they arrive for the banquet that all are invited to attend everyone will say to the Holy Family: “Enter.  There is always room in our hearts and homes for the Holy Family.”  They will then be seated at a special table and be the first to be served at the banquet.  

In 1650, the Sisters of St. Joseph was founded and there are about 14,000 members.  In 1870, Pope Pius IX named St. Joseph the Patron Saint of the Universal Church.  According to Catholic Tradition as he died in the arms of Jesus and Mary, Joseph is considered the model of a pious believer who receives grace at the moment of death.   St. Joseph is invoked against hesitation and for the grace toward a holy death.  The Egyptians were also among the early devotes to St. Joseph along with the Servites, a religious order of Mendicant Friars who began celebrating St.  Josephs Day around the 14th Century.   They started celebrating his feast day in 1871, when the Josephite Fathers of the Catholic Church were founded to work with the poor.  Under the patronage of St. Joseph, the 1st Josephites in America devoted their ministry to working with the newly emancipated African American Community and in 1878, the Oblates of St. Joseph was established by Josep Marello.  St. Joseph is also the patron saint of fathers, families, carpenters, expectant mothers, and unborn children.  In 1955, Pope Pius XII added a second day, May 1st celebrated as the memorial of St. Joseph, the worker who toiled as a carpenter and is seen as a powerful intercessor for those in the workforce and for anyone seeking employment.  Pope John XXIII added Joseph’s name to the Canon of the Mass in 1962.  It was inserted immediately after that of the Blessed Virgin Mary and in 2013, Pope Francis inserted St. Joseph’s name to three other Eucharistic Prayers. St. Joseph is remembered in the Church of England and also in the Episcopal Church on this day.  

On December 8, 2020, Pope Francis released his Apostolic letter, “Patris Corde”, on the 150th Anniversary of the declaration by Pope Pius IX that made St. Joseph the Patron of the Universal Church.  Pope Francis then announced that the following year, December 8, 2020, to December 8, 2021, would be set aside as the Year of St. Joseph.  There is a Catholic tradition of burying a statue of St. Joseph on the grounds of your homes as a faster way to sell a house.  A Prayer on the Feast Day of St. Joseph: “Let us make St. Joseph our Lenten Saint on the way to Easter.  May we have a semblance of His Humility, Great Faith, and Trust in God.  St. Joseph, Pray for us.”  

On Saturday, March 23rd, we celebrate the Saint of the day, Saint Turibius of Mogrovejo, Archbishop of Lima.  He was born in Spain, educated in law, and went on to become a Professor of Law at the University of Salamanca.  With his knowledge, Turibius cited all the Canons of the Law within the Catholic Church.  After his Ordination and appointment, as Bishop, he was assigned an enormous Archdiocese, visiting and most of the times staying 2 or 3 days in each place.  In his years as Archbishop, Turibius Baptized and Confirmed 500,000 of the faithful serving the Lord in Peru, South America for 26 years.  Among those who he baptized and confirmed are Martin de Porres, Missionary Francisco Solano, and Isable Flores de Olivia (St. Rose of Lima) who would all become saints.  He was known for his devotion to the Blessed Virgin, saying the Rosary every day and fasting every Saturday in her honor.  He worked for the infant Church of Peru and for everyone in his diocese, that they would be able to receive instruction and the benefits of the sacraments while traveling thousands of miles through the wilderness to say Mass.  He aided the Archbishop of Lima and was consecrated a Bishop in 1581 at the age of 43.  His Diocese extended 130 leagues along the coast or 390 miles.  He upheld the rights of Peru’s Indigenous Peoples while making sure he reached all who wanted to hear the message of Christ and receive the Sacraments.  He built roads, schoolhouses, chapels, and in 1591 founded the first Seminary in the Western Hemisphere. 

He built many hospitals and would visit patients, comforting the sick while administering the Sacraments.  Turibius preached penance saying: “Because sins are the cause of chastisements and infinitely the worst of evils”.  In 1606, Turibius became ill while visiting his Diocese and from his bed, he often repeated the words of St. Paul: “I desire to be dissolved and to be with Christ.”  Many miracles were attributed to him through his intercession after his death.  He was Beatified by Pope Innocent IX in 1679 and Canonized by Pope benedict XIII in 1726 and is the Patron Saint of Native Peoples rights and Latin American Bishops.   There is the St. Turibius Chapel located at the Pontifical College Josephinum and the St. Turibius Parish in Chicago serving the English, Spanish and Polish Communities.  Pope Francis has compared St. Turibius to the great Italian, St. Charles Borromeo praising him for his Missionary zeal.

News from San Antonio Church – March 10, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin March 10, 2024

by Terrie Evans

On March 10th, we celebrate the halfway point of Lent with Laetare or Rejoice Sunday using rose-colored vestments and altar cloth with the theme for this day coming from the entrance antiphon: “Rejoice, Jerusalem, and all who love her.   Be joyful, all who were in mourning; exalt and be satisfied at her consoling breast.”  Observed in Western Christianity as a countdown for the last 21 days before Easter Sunday it is also known as Mothering Sunday, for the tradition of visiting their mother church, the church where they received the Sacrament of Baptism, a tradition for Christians celebrated in the Lutheran and Anglican Churches.  A Collect Prayer of the Fourth Sunday of Lent: “O, God, through your Word reconcile the human race to yourself in a wonderful way, grant, we pray, that with prompt devotion and eager faith the Christian people may hasten toward the solemn celebrations to come.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, for ever and ever.  AMEN.”

On this 4th Sunday of Lent, the Station Church in Rome for this day is Santa Croce in Gerusalemme that was consecrated in 325 and originally part of the Palazzo Sessoriano home to Empress Helena, the mother of Emperor Constantine.  At that time, Constantine converted to Christianity and ordered all pagan temples to be torn down and replaced with Christian Churches.  When she journeyed to the Holy City in the 4th Century, Helena would dig through rubble from those demolished temples for anything that would lead her to the True Cross.   Her prayers were answered when workers found a block of wood with writing in Hebrew, Greek, and Latin: Jesus Nazarenus Rex Ludaeorum, I.N.R.I. Jesus of Nazareth, King of The Jews. For her return to Rome, Helena loaded up her boat with a piece of the True Cross, a piece of the Good Thief’s cross, the titulus, the sign placed on the cross” Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews, and some nails and thorns from the Crown of Thorns.  She also had the top layer of earth from Mount Calvary removed and placed the soil in the hold of the ship sailing from Jerusalem and then dispersing it all around her property in Rome.   

Helena then built the Basilica Sanctae Croce in Gerusalemme, the Basilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem, designed to house those relics from Christs Passion.  It was declared a Titular Church in 523 by Pope Gregory I and even though it was located on the outskirts of Rome, became a popular destination for pilgrims because of the relics housed there.  In the 8th Century, Pope Gregory II restored the Basilica and years later in 1049, Pope Leo IX entrusted it to the Benedictines of Monte Cassino and when it became neglected, and Pope Lucius II restored it in the 12th Century giving it a Romanesque appearance.  Around 1370, Santa Croce was assigned by Pope Urban V to the Carthusians until 1561 when the Congregation of St. Bernard took over, In 1601 Peter Paul Rubens was commissioned by Archduke Albert of Austria to paint his first altarpiece St. Helena with the True Cross to be placed in one of the side chapels.  In 1740, Pope Benedict XIV conducted more renovations and in 1743, the basilica was raised a few meters although the floor was not touched out of respect.    Some of the features are the marble tomb of Cardinal Quinones, the confessor of Charles V, two frescoes from 1745 depicting the story of Moses.  In the history of the Basilica, on Good Friday, the Pope would walk barefoot on the road connecting St. John Lateran, the official Cathedral of Rome to the Basilica of Santa Croce.  They did this as a sign of penance to venerate the Passion of Jesus.  On Laetare Sunday in Rome, Pope Francis will bestow a Golden Rose to an illustrious Catholic, states, churches, sanctuaries, royals, military figures, and governments as a token of affection. 

The Golden Rose is an ornament composed of gems and gold with an inner container of balsam and musk that bears a likeness to a spray of roses.  It is blessed by the Pope and symbolizes the glorious majesty of the Risen Christ.  “The Messiah is hailed the flower of the field and the lily of the valleys” as stated in the Bible.  Pope Leo XIII said: “The roses fragrance shows the sweet odor of Christ which should be widely diffused by His faithful followers”.  Pope Innocent III explained the mystical significance of the Golden Rose: “As Laetare Sunday, the day set apart for the function, represents love after hate, joy after sorrow, and fullness after hunger, so does the rose to the flower referred to in Isiah 11:1: “There shall come forth a rod out of the root of Jesus, and a flower shall rise up out of His root.” At one time, the Golden Rose consisted of a simple blossom made of pure gold that was tinted with red. Years later the gold was not tinted but rubies and precious stones would be placed on the petals and in the heart of the rose.  It was originally a little over three inches in height and was carried in the left hand of the Pope so he could bless the faithful with his right hand while in the procession from the Santa Croce in Gerusalemme (Rome) to the Lateran Palace.  A vase with a large pedestal was added and during the reign of Pope Innocent XI, the rose weighed twenty pounds with a height of eighteen inches.  There will be a customary inscription with the coat of arms of the Pope who had the ornament made and that of who blessed and conferred it engraved on the pedestal. Many times, the blessing of the rose took place in a private chapel of their palace if the Pope was unable to visit Roman churches or basilicas.  The blessing now takes place in the Hall of Vestments with the Golden Rose set on a table that is adorned with lit candles.   Pope Francis will be vested in a rose-colored stole and cope wearing his miter headdress.  After the blessing it is placed on the altar at the foot of the Cross and bestowed on its recipient who could be a man, woman, married couple, a state, or churches. 

Up until the 16th century, the Golden Rose was usually awarded to male sovereigns but later it was common to award female sovereigns or wives of sovereigns.  Principal Churches to receive the Golden Rose are St. Peter’s Basilica, the Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, the Basilica of Our Lady of Aparecida and the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore.  Some of the Popes made no awards of the Golden Rose during their tenure as Pope Pius X, Pope Benedict XV, Pope John XXIII, and Pope John Paul I did.  The practice was revived by Pope Pius XI and continued by Pope Pius XII.  From 1963-1978, Pope Paul VI made 5 awards, Pope John Paul II who reigned from 1978-2005 made 10 awards, and Pope Benedict XVI from 2005-2013 made 19 awards to Marian Shrines.  Pope Francis over the years has awarded 4 Golden Roses, all to Marian Shrines.  

On this Sunday, Notre Dame will announce the recipient of the Laetare Medal given each year on the 4th Sunday of Lent as the American counterpart of the Golden Rose.  The medal awarded annually at Notre Dame to a Catholic “Whose genius has enabled the Arts and Sciences, illustrated the ideals of the Church, and enriched the Heritage of Humanity”.  Established in 1883, the Laetare Medal bears the Latin inscription, “Magna est veritas et praevalebit” (Truth is great and will prevail).   Some of the past recipients of the Laetare Medal are:  Civil War General William Rosencrans, Operatic Tenor, John McCormack, the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy, Catholic Worker Foundress, Dorothy Day, Novelist Walker Percy, Cardinal Joseph Bernadin, Monsignor George H. Higgins, Jazz Composer Dave Brubeck, and Actor Martin Sheen.                                             

Our San Antonio Church community sends their condolences to the Scarlato Family on the passing of their Patriarch, Alberto Scarlato who passed away on February 22, 2024, at the age of 90.   He was the Father of Gina (Scarlato) McIntyre, David (Judy) Scarlato and the late Joey Scarlato.  He was the beloved Grandpa of Sarah (Brett), Angla (Kyle), Bo (Emma), Olivia (Andrew), Kristin (Ethan), Colin, Isabella, and Joey.  Great Grandpa of Brady, Emma, Liam, Griffin, Luca, Isla, Hudson, Harper, Palmer, Poppy, Ellie, Anthony, and Vincent.   Members of the Scarlato Family have celebrated many Baptisms and Weddings at San Antonio Church over the years.   The late Gilda (Panaro) Scarlato (1932-2007) who grew up in the Little Italy of South Fairmount was the mother of Alberto’s children, Gina, David, and the late Joey.   Gilda “Jil” had many family connections within the San Antonio Church Community and also with the Marckesano, Panaro, Minella and Sheets families who also mourn his passing.  Alberto Scarlato was the son of the late Fiore (1890-1958) and Christine (Pucci) Scarlato (1892-1968) both born in Italy who came to America in the early 1900’s and settled in Cincinnati at 3234 Queen City Avenue.   Alberto was the beloved brother of the late Emil Scarlato (1912-1983), Hector Scarlato (1922-1973), Raymond Scarlato (9124-2003), Rudolph Scarlato (1925-2001), Loretta (Scarlato) Sheets (1928-2011), Margaret Scarlato (1932-1935) and Christine (Scarlato) Gundrum (1930-2018).  Please keep their family and friends in your prayers. 

On this Sunday,  prayers  and special intentions are needed at this time for Chuck Brisbin who has been hospitalized due to a serious accident.  His wife Susan (Schultz) Brisbin is part of the Gramaglia Family who have had a presence in the neighborhood of Little Italy and a history at San Antonio Church.  Susan’s mother is Therese (Gramaglia) Schultz who was a long-standing member of our church and part of the Men’s and Ladies Sodality. The Brisbin Family are well known on the west side and throughout Cincinnati for the popularity of Chuck Brisbin’s Blues Band, the Tuna Project.  Please keep them in your thoughts and prayers that he will be able to make a full recovery.

News from San Antonio Church – March 3, 2024

We would like to thank everyone who has continued to contribute to the ongoing expenses of San Antonio Church by mailing in their weekly envelopes or by contributing electronically utilizing WeShare . The buttons at the bottom of this post allow you to make online donations directly to the listed account for San Antonio Church.

Weekly Bulletin March 3, 2024

by Terrie Evans

On this 3rd Sunday in Lent, we introduce the Station Church celebrated in Rome, the Basilica of San Lorenzo fuori le Mura, the Papal Basilica of Saint Lawrence Outside the Walls.  Lawrence was of Spanish origin and martyred under Emperor Valerius with the Papal Minor Basilica named in his honor was one of the first seven deacons of Rome martyred in 258.  It is one of the Seven Pilgrim Churches of Rome, once an estate built over a small oratory erected by Emperor Constatine that also keeps relics of St. Stefano.  This Station Church is a combination of two churches, the first built in the 6th Century dedicated to the Deacon Lawrence and the other constructed around the 13th Century by Pope Honorius III who commissioned a church to be built in front of the older one.  The Basilica is known for the frescoes and mosaics that depict scenes from the lives of the young deacons Lawrence and Stephen.   The Basilica was assigned to the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem during the years of 1373-1847 and sits next to a major cemetery with notables in the history of the Catholic Church buried there.  Some of those from the early Church are Deacon of Rome and Martyr, Lawrence, Deacon of Jerusalem, and 1st Martyr, Stephen, Pope Hilarius, Pope Pius IX, Italian Prime Minister Alcide De Gasperi, a founding father of the European Union, Pope Pius XII’s parents, Filippo who died in 1916 and Virginia (Graziosi) Pacelli who died in 1920, Pope Zosimus, Pope Sixtus III, and Pope Damasus II.  The Basilica was bombed in 1943 by American planes during the second World War doing much damage.  The restoration continued until 1948 as all the frescoes on the façade were destroyed and had to be completely rebuilt after the bombings.  High  360 degree  panoramas and images of San Lorenzo fuori le Mura Art Atlas (https://mcid.mcah.columbia.edu/art-atlas/ancient-and-early-christian-sites-rome/san-lorenzo-fuori-le-mura ).  

On Monday, March 4th we celebrate St. Casimir, son of King Casimir IV and a Prince of the Kingdom of Poland who abandoned public life for a monastic life devoted to God. As a young Prince, he knew Lithuanian, Polish, German, and Latin languages and was considered an exceptional, intelligent young man of humility who strove for justice and fairness.  He chose not to marry and practiced a life of celibacy, exceedingly rare for a young man of his standing at that time. He died in 1484 on his way to Lithuania from consumption at the age of 26 and was buried with a copy of his favorite Marian Hymn, Omni die Mariae “Daily Sing to Mary”.  It   became associated to Casimir and known as the “Hymn of St. Casimir” as an official cult spread with a devotion to him after his death.  Pope Adrian VI canonized him in 1522 with special indulgences granted to those who prayed in the chapel where he was buried. Many of those pilgrims made special contributions for the upkeep of the chapel in honor of St. Casimir.  The likeness of St. Casimir can be found in Livorno, Italy and in Mexico City at the Metropolitan Cathedral with stained glass windows of Casimir located in San Jose, California at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Joseph and in Chevaigne, France at the Church of St. Peter. There are settlements of Saint-Casimir in Canada, founded in 1836 and in San Casimiro in Venezuela that was founded in 1785.  A nursing home founded   by the Polish community in Paris, Maison Saint-Casimir was founded in 1846 and is run by the Polish Nuns, Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul.  St. Casimir is considered the Patron Saint of Lithuania, Poland, and Russia. 

On Thursday, March 7th we honor Christian Martyrs from the 3rd Century, Perpetua and Felicity who were arrested and executed for offering themselves as candidates for Baptism to become Christians and they would not denounce their faith.  They lived during the period of early persecutions in Africa by the Emperor Severus and along others were put to death at Carthage in the Roman Province of Africa in 203.  The four men martyred with the two women were catechumens, Saturninus, Secundulus, Saturus, and Revocatus.  During their arrest, none of the prisoners weakened before their judges as they said, “You judge us now, God will judge you”. Perpetua, a young, widowed mother is the Patron saint of expectant mothers, ranchers, and builders.  A Basilica was erected in Carthage, the Basilica Maiorum over the tombs of the Martyrs with an inscription bearing the names of Perpetua and Felicitas who were canonized pre-congregation.  A Prayer to Sts. Perpetua and Felicity: “Heavenly Father, Your love enabled the Saints Perpetua and Felicity courage to endure a cruel martyrdom.  By their prayers, help us to develop a love for You.  Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Your Son, who lives and reigns with You, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  AMEN.”

Friday, March 8th we celebrate the life of John of God, who left home before his teens to become a foot soldier at the age of 22.  His company fought for the Holy Roman Emperor and was wrongly accused of theft as a young man before being pardoned and returning to a farm in Oropesa where he had once worked herding sheep.  After four years working as a farm hand, he enlisted to fight in Hungary as a soldier during the Franco-Spanish War fighting against the Turks. During the next 18 years, he would serve as a trooper in many parts of Europe. He was still unsettled and wanted to see Africa and work to free Christians who were enslaved there.  On his way there, John befriended an exiled Portuguese Knight traveling with his wife and daughters who were now ill and penniless from their possessions being lost during their journey.  After their arrival, Joao Duarte Cidade, John of God nursed them back to health while supplying them with food even though they were all treated poorly by the rulers of the colony.  During this difficult time in his life, he sought out the Franciscan Friary for an answer to what his life’s work might be and what God might want from him.  With the vision of the Infant Jesus in front of him, he was now to be called John of God and directed to travel to Granada, Spain.  On St. Sebastians’ Day, in 1537, he experienced a major religious conversion while listening to a sermon by John of Avila who would later visit him and urge John to tend to the needs of others, gaining peace within himself as he began to work among the poor.  He had help from the Archbishop of Granada and many ladies of wealth who wanted to assist in his work.   He went on to organize the Brothers Hospitallers of Saint John of God in 1572 to care for the sick in countries around the world.  He cared for those with paralysis, the deaf and dumb, the lepers, the crippled, the mentally ill and those with diseases of the skin.   The Order of Hospitallers was approved by the Holy See and the Order would go on to be entrusted with the medical care of the Pope.  John of God died at age 55 on March 8, 1550, after developing pneumonia from saving a young man from drowning in the River Genil.  He was canonized by Pope Alexander VIII on October 16, 1690, and named the Patron Saint of hospitals and the sick.  A church was erected in 1757 to house his remains that is now a Basilica protected by the Knights of Saint John of God.  His Order has a presence in 53 countries operating 300 hospitals to serve all types of medical needs along with those needing mental health and psychiatry care.  The Family of Saint John of God who work to keep his vision alive are made up of more than 45,000 members, Brothers and Co-Workers who are funded by many thousands of benefactors and friends who support his work to help the sick and needy around the world.

On March 9th, Saturday we celebrate the life of Frances of Rome.  Born Francesca Bussa de Leoni in 1384, an Italian Mystic and Organizer of Charitable Services.  She was Christened in the Church of St. Agnes located on the famous Piazza Navona.  At age of 11, Frances desired to become a nun, but was promised to marry the Commander of the Papal Troops of Rome, Lorenzo Ponziani when she reached the suitable age to wed.  In 1408 when the troops of Ladislaus of Naples occupied Rome, they pillaged their family home, and her family left to go into exile.  Returning in 1414, they lost two of their children to the plague that ravaged the city.  During these hard times, Frances never lost her faith or determination to serve others in need from the devastation of recurrent plagues that swept through the area or the civil war.  In 1425, she set up a group of women committed to the service of those less fortunate than themselves.  She inspired women from noble families to care for the poor and sick during times of famines and floods.  She turned some of the family estate into a hospital and distributed much needed food and clothing to the poor.  They were affiliated to the Benedictine Monks of Monte Oliveto, and with Frances’s example, the ladies sold their jewelry and fine possessions to help the needy.  They offered themselves in service to God for the poor known as the Oblates of Mary who were later called Oblates of Tor de Specchi (Towers of the Mirrors), the name originating from the house where they resided.  Frances chose not to live in the community but rather with her husband until his death 7 years later.  When Lorenzo died in 1436, Frances moved to the monastery and spent the last four years of her life as the Superior until her death in 1440 at the age of 56.  Pope Paul V canonized Frances on May 9, 1608, and in the next decades, a search was made to find her remains.  Her grave was found on April 2, 1638, and her remains were reburied in the Church of Santa Maria Nova on March 9, 1649.  St. Frances body was exhumed in 1869 and has been displayed in a glass coffin for the veneration of the faithful at the Church of Santa Maria Nova.  Since then the church is now dedicated to her as the Church of St. Frances.  Pope Pius XI in 1925 declared St. Frances the patron saint of automobile drivers with the legend of an angel using a lantern to light the road when Frances traveled to keep her safe.  In the Benedictine Order, she is honored as a patron saint of all oblates.  Oblates are those religious communities of men and women whose members are not solemnly professed but are dedicated to God under poverty, chastity, and obedience in their particular state in life. 

On Saturday. March 9th San Antonio and our church community held a memorial Mass in memory of Rev. Frederick Serraino, C.S.C. for his family and friends who were not able to attend his Funeral on February 9, 2024, at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on the University of Notre Dame.  He was born on August 16, 1930, to parents Antonio and Philomenia (Mania) Serraino and grew up in the Little Italy section of South Fairmount.  After graduating from Western Hills High School Fred served with the 31st Infantry during the Korean War.  On his return, Fred enrolled at Xavier University and earned a bachelor’s degree in English before moving to Los Angeles where he took a job working for the Douglas Aircraft Company.  He desired to teach and took a job in Wrangell, Arkansas teaching for the U.S. Civil Service Commission and was sent to Germany teaching school at a U.S. Army Base before returning to Los Angeles taking night classes at UCLA and offering his services as a substitute teacher.  His calling came in 1963 when he entered the Holy Cross Seminary with his Ordination as a Holy Cross Priest taking place on December 21, 1968.  He was then assigned in 1969 to the faculty at St. Peters High School in Gloucester, Massachusetts as one of the Holy Cross Priests at the school that was established in 1965 and drew boys from not only Gloucester, but Salem, Lynn, and other areas of the state.  The graduating class of 1969 had 105 seniors.  He was then assigned as a member of the faculty of Notre Dame High School in Biloxi, Mississippi where he taught until 1972, he then he served in Peru as an Assistant in Cartavio, where sugar cane is grown until 1975.  On his return he became a member of the faculty at Bishop McNamara High School for four years in Forestville, Maryland before relocating to California to assist at the Holy Cross Family Theater until 1985.  In 1985-1986 Fr. Fred continued his studies at the Nova University in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida and assisted at St. Julianas Parish in West Palm Beach, Florida 1990-1991.  He was then assigned as an Assistant Pastor of Sacred Heart Parish in Brooklyn, New York for four years before taking a sabbatical for one year to become a National Director for the Holy Cross Family Theatre in California in 1996 that produced impactful, faith-based family entertainment to inspire and educate and provide programs to television and radio broadcast outlets.   He was sent back to Peru to become the Assistant District Superior in Lima from 1998-2003 before serving as Assistant Superior at Christopher Lodge in Cocoa Beach, Florida until 2006.  Fr. Fred went on to serve as a Holy Cross Father as Director of Health and Aging for the Provincial House in Bridgeport, Connecticut from 2006-2008 and then assigned as Superior of the Dartmouth Community in North Dartmouth, Massachusetts home for retired priests in the Congregation of Holy Cross that sat on 59 acres and once housed 12-14 priests.   He then returned to reside at the Christopher Lodge named after Fr. Christopher O’ Toole former Superior and the 1st Provincial of the Southern Province until 2019.   When he retired, Fr. Fred Serraino moved to the Holy Cross House in Notre Dame Indiana.  His burial was in the Holy Cross Community Cemetery at Notre Dame.  There are about 1,000 religious’ members in 16 countries and on 5 continents.  The United States Province of Holy Cross Priests and Brothers is made up of 500 priests, brothers and seminarians that are headquartered at Notre Dame.  He was preceded in death by his parents, Antonio and Philomena Serraino, sisters Louise (Serraino) Jackson and Rose Serraino and close friend from the neighborhood, Ralph Minella.  He is survived by Sister, Carmella (Serraino) Berger, Brothers Frank and Wayne Serraino and best friend Donald “Buddy” LaRosa.  He also leaves many nieces, nephews, extended family members and close friends to mourn his passing.